MRI criteria for dissemination in space in patients with clinically isolated syndromes: A multicentre follow-up study

Tijmen Korteweg, Mar Tintoré, Bernard Uitdehaag, Alex Rovira, Jette Frederiksen, David Miller, Kryshani Fernando, Massimo Filippi, Federica Agosta, Maria Rocca, Franz Fazekas, Christian Enzinger, Paul Matthews, Allyson Parry, Chris Polman, Xavier Montalban, Frederik Barkhof

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The McDonald International Panel accepted the Barkhof/Tintoré criteria for providing MRI evidence of dissemination in space to allow a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis in patients with clinically isolated syndromes (CIS). We applied these criteria in a large cohort of patients with CIS, representative of those seen in a general diagnostic setting, to assess their accuracy in predicting conversion to definite multiple sclerosis and to identify factors that affect this risk. Methods: In a collaborative study of seven centres, baseline MRI and clinical follow-up data for 532 patients with CIS were studied, with the development of a second clinical event used as the main outcome. All scans were scored for lesion counts and spatial lesion distribution to assess the fulfilment - ie, at least three out of four - of the Barkhof/Tintoré criteria. We used survival analysis and 2x2 tables to assess the test characteristics of the criteria at baseline. Findings: Overall conversion rate was 32·5% with a median survival time of 85·3 months. Fulfilment of the criteria at baseline showed, after a survival time of 2 years, a conversion rate of about 45% (95% CI 37-53) versus about 10% (6-16) in those with no asymptomatic lesions at baseline (p

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)221-227
Number of pages7
JournalThe Lancet Neurology
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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