Multicenter Study on Sleep and Circadian Alterations as Objective Markers of Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's Disease Reveals Sex Differences: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease

B. Guarnieri, M. Maestri, F. Cucchiara, A. Lo Gerfo, A. Schirru, D. Arnaldi, P. Mattioli, F. Nobili, G. Lombardi, G. Cerroni, A. Bartoli, R. Manni, E. Sinforiani, M. Terzaghi, M.G. Arena, R. Silvestri, C. La Morgia, M.C. DI Perri, F. Franzoni, G. TognoniM. Mancuso, S. Sorbi, U. Bonuccelli, G. Siciliano, U. Faraguna, E. Bonanni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Circadian and sleep disturbances are associated with increased risk of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Wearable activity trackers could provide a new approach in diagnosis and prevention. Objective: To evaluate sleep and circadian rhythm parameters, through wearable activity trackers, in MCI and AD patients as compared to controls, focusing on sex dissimilarities. Methods: Based on minute level data from consumer wearable devices, we analyzed actigraphic sleep parameters by applying an electromedical type I registered algorithm, and the corresponding circadian variables in 158 subjects: 86 females and 72 males (42 AD, 28 MCI, and 88 controls). Moreover, we used a confusion-matrix chart method to assess accuracy, precision, sensitivity, and specificity of two decision-tree models based on actigraphic data in predicting disease or health status. Results: Wake after sleep onset (WASO) was higher (p
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1707-1719
Number of pages13
JournalJ. Alzheimer's Dis.
Volume78
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • circadian rhythms
  • confusion matrix
  • mild cognitive impairment
  • sex differences
  • sleep disturbances
  • sleep parameters
  • sleep regularity index
  • wearable activity tracker

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Multicenter Study on Sleep and Circadian Alterations as Objective Markers of Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's Disease Reveals Sex Differences: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this