Multipeptide vaccination in cancer patients

Lorenzo Pilla, Licia Rivoltini, Roberto Patuzzo, Andrea Marrari, Riccardo Valdagni, G. Parmiani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Since the identification of tumor associated antigens (TAA) in different tumor histotypes, many vaccination strategies have been investigated, including peptide-based vaccines. Results from the first decade of clinical experimentation, though demonstrating the feasibility and the good toxicity profile of this approach, provided evidence of clinical activity only in a minority of patients, despite inducing immunization in up to 50% of them. In this review, we discuss the different approaches recently developed in order to induce stronger peptide-induced immune-mediated tumor growth control, possibly translating into improved clinical response rates, with specific focus on multipeptide-based anti-cancer vaccines. This strategy offers many advantages, such as the possibility of bypassing tumor heterogeneity and selection of antigen (Ag)-negative clones escaping peptide-specific immune responses, or combining HLA class I- and class II-restricted epitopes, thus eliciting both CD4- and CD8-mediated immune recognition. Notably, advances in Ag discovery technologies permit further optimization of peptide selection, in terms of identification of tumor-specific and unique TAA as well as Ags derived from different tumor microenvironment cell components. With the ultimate goal of combining peptide selection with patient-specific immunogenic profile, peptide based anti-cancer vaccines remain a promising treatment for cancer patients, as attested by of pre-clinical and clinical studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1043-1055
Number of pages13
JournalExpert Opinion on Biological Therapy
Volume9
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2009

Fingerprint

Tumors
Vaccination
Peptides
Cancer Vaccines
Neoplasm Antigens
Neoplasms
Antigens
Subunit Vaccines
Tumor Microenvironment
Cellular Structures
Immunization
Patient Selection
Epitopes
Clone Cells
Technology
Toxicity
Vaccines
Growth
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Clinical trial
  • Immunotherapy
  • Peptide vaccine
  • Tumor antigens

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Drug Discovery

Cite this

Multipeptide vaccination in cancer patients. / Pilla, Lorenzo; Rivoltini, Licia; Patuzzo, Roberto; Marrari, Andrea; Valdagni, Riccardo; Parmiani, G.

In: Expert Opinion on Biological Therapy, Vol. 9, No. 8, 08.2009, p. 1043-1055.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pilla, Lorenzo ; Rivoltini, Licia ; Patuzzo, Roberto ; Marrari, Andrea ; Valdagni, Riccardo ; Parmiani, G. / Multipeptide vaccination in cancer patients. In: Expert Opinion on Biological Therapy. 2009 ; Vol. 9, No. 8. pp. 1043-1055.
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