Multiple electrolyte disorders in a neurosurgical patient: Solving the rebus

Valeria Corradetti, Pasquale Esposito, Teresa Rampino, Marilena Gregorini, Carmelo Libetta, Francesca Bosio, Teresa Valsania, Eleonora Francesca Pattonieri, Chiara Rocca, Stefania Bianzina, Antonio Dal Canton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: It is important to ensure an adequate sodium and volume balance in neurosurgical patients in order to avoid the worsening of brain injury.Indeed, hyponatremia and polyuria, that are frequent in this patient population, are potentially harmful, especially if not promptly recognized.Differential diagnosis is often challenging, including disorders, which, in view of similar clinical pictures, present very different pathophysiological bases, such as syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis, cerebral/renal salt wasting syndrome and diabetes insipidus. Case presentation. Here we present the clinical report of a 67-year-old man with a recent episode of acute subarachnoid haemorrhage, admitted to our ward because of severe hyponatremia, hypokalemia and huge polyuria.We performed a complete workup to identify the underlying causes of these alterations and found a complex picture of salt wasting syndrome associated to primary polydipsia. The appropriate diagnosis allowed us to correct the patient hydro-electrolyte balance. Conclusion: The comprehension of the pathophysiological mechanisms is essential to adequately recognize and treat hydro-electrolyte disorders, also solving the most complex clinical problems.

Original languageEnglish
Article number140
JournalBMC Nephrology
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Electrolytes
Wasting Syndrome
Polyuria
Hyponatremia
Psychogenic Polydipsia
Salts
Diabetes Insipidus
Water-Electrolyte Balance
Hypokalemia
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
Brain Injuries
Differential Diagnosis
Sodium
Kidney
Population

Keywords

  • Hypokalemia
  • Hyponatremia
  • Polyuria
  • Primary polydipsia
  • Salt wasting syndromes
  • Subarachnoid haemorrhage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

Cite this

Multiple electrolyte disorders in a neurosurgical patient : Solving the rebus. / Corradetti, Valeria; Esposito, Pasquale; Rampino, Teresa; Gregorini, Marilena; Libetta, Carmelo; Bosio, Francesca; Valsania, Teresa; Pattonieri, Eleonora Francesca; Rocca, Chiara; Bianzina, Stefania; Dal Canton, Antonio.

In: BMC Nephrology, Vol. 14, No. 1, 140, 2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Corradetti, V, Esposito, P, Rampino, T, Gregorini, M, Libetta, C, Bosio, F, Valsania, T, Pattonieri, EF, Rocca, C, Bianzina, S & Dal Canton, A 2013, 'Multiple electrolyte disorders in a neurosurgical patient: Solving the rebus', BMC Nephrology, vol. 14, no. 1, 140. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2369-14-140
Corradetti, Valeria ; Esposito, Pasquale ; Rampino, Teresa ; Gregorini, Marilena ; Libetta, Carmelo ; Bosio, Francesca ; Valsania, Teresa ; Pattonieri, Eleonora Francesca ; Rocca, Chiara ; Bianzina, Stefania ; Dal Canton, Antonio. / Multiple electrolyte disorders in a neurosurgical patient : Solving the rebus. In: BMC Nephrology. 2013 ; Vol. 14, No. 1.
@article{61f7ace6040845a385b695a046635905,
title = "Multiple electrolyte disorders in a neurosurgical patient: Solving the rebus",
abstract = "Background: It is important to ensure an adequate sodium and volume balance in neurosurgical patients in order to avoid the worsening of brain injury.Indeed, hyponatremia and polyuria, that are frequent in this patient population, are potentially harmful, especially if not promptly recognized.Differential diagnosis is often challenging, including disorders, which, in view of similar clinical pictures, present very different pathophysiological bases, such as syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis, cerebral/renal salt wasting syndrome and diabetes insipidus. Case presentation. Here we present the clinical report of a 67-year-old man with a recent episode of acute subarachnoid haemorrhage, admitted to our ward because of severe hyponatremia, hypokalemia and huge polyuria.We performed a complete workup to identify the underlying causes of these alterations and found a complex picture of salt wasting syndrome associated to primary polydipsia. The appropriate diagnosis allowed us to correct the patient hydro-electrolyte balance. Conclusion: The comprehension of the pathophysiological mechanisms is essential to adequately recognize and treat hydro-electrolyte disorders, also solving the most complex clinical problems.",
keywords = "Hypokalemia, Hyponatremia, Polyuria, Primary polydipsia, Salt wasting syndromes, Subarachnoid haemorrhage",
author = "Valeria Corradetti and Pasquale Esposito and Teresa Rampino and Marilena Gregorini and Carmelo Libetta and Francesca Bosio and Teresa Valsania and Pattonieri, {Eleonora Francesca} and Chiara Rocca and Stefania Bianzina and {Dal Canton}, Antonio",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1186/1471-2369-14-140",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
journal = "BMC Nephrology",
issn = "1471-2369",
publisher = "BMC",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Multiple electrolyte disorders in a neurosurgical patient

T2 - Solving the rebus

AU - Corradetti, Valeria

AU - Esposito, Pasquale

AU - Rampino, Teresa

AU - Gregorini, Marilena

AU - Libetta, Carmelo

AU - Bosio, Francesca

AU - Valsania, Teresa

AU - Pattonieri, Eleonora Francesca

AU - Rocca, Chiara

AU - Bianzina, Stefania

AU - Dal Canton, Antonio

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Background: It is important to ensure an adequate sodium and volume balance in neurosurgical patients in order to avoid the worsening of brain injury.Indeed, hyponatremia and polyuria, that are frequent in this patient population, are potentially harmful, especially if not promptly recognized.Differential diagnosis is often challenging, including disorders, which, in view of similar clinical pictures, present very different pathophysiological bases, such as syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis, cerebral/renal salt wasting syndrome and diabetes insipidus. Case presentation. Here we present the clinical report of a 67-year-old man with a recent episode of acute subarachnoid haemorrhage, admitted to our ward because of severe hyponatremia, hypokalemia and huge polyuria.We performed a complete workup to identify the underlying causes of these alterations and found a complex picture of salt wasting syndrome associated to primary polydipsia. The appropriate diagnosis allowed us to correct the patient hydro-electrolyte balance. Conclusion: The comprehension of the pathophysiological mechanisms is essential to adequately recognize and treat hydro-electrolyte disorders, also solving the most complex clinical problems.

AB - Background: It is important to ensure an adequate sodium and volume balance in neurosurgical patients in order to avoid the worsening of brain injury.Indeed, hyponatremia and polyuria, that are frequent in this patient population, are potentially harmful, especially if not promptly recognized.Differential diagnosis is often challenging, including disorders, which, in view of similar clinical pictures, present very different pathophysiological bases, such as syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis, cerebral/renal salt wasting syndrome and diabetes insipidus. Case presentation. Here we present the clinical report of a 67-year-old man with a recent episode of acute subarachnoid haemorrhage, admitted to our ward because of severe hyponatremia, hypokalemia and huge polyuria.We performed a complete workup to identify the underlying causes of these alterations and found a complex picture of salt wasting syndrome associated to primary polydipsia. The appropriate diagnosis allowed us to correct the patient hydro-electrolyte balance. Conclusion: The comprehension of the pathophysiological mechanisms is essential to adequately recognize and treat hydro-electrolyte disorders, also solving the most complex clinical problems.

KW - Hypokalemia

KW - Hyponatremia

KW - Polyuria

KW - Primary polydipsia

KW - Salt wasting syndromes

KW - Subarachnoid haemorrhage

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84880001858&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84880001858&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/1471-2369-14-140

DO - 10.1186/1471-2369-14-140

M3 - Article

C2 - 23837469

AN - SCOPUS:84880001858

VL - 14

JO - BMC Nephrology

JF - BMC Nephrology

SN - 1471-2369

IS - 1

M1 - 140

ER -