Multiple monoclonal B cell expansions and c-myc oncogene rearrangements in acquired immune deficiency syndrome-related lymphoproliferative disorders. Implications for lymphomagenesis

P. G. Pelicci, D. M. Knowles, Z. A. Arlin, R. Wieczorek, P. Luciw, D. Dina, C. Basilico, R. Dalla-Favera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) and ARC (AIDS-related complex) are associated with a spectrum of lymphoproliferative disorders ranging from lymphadenopathy syndrome (LAS), an apparently benign polyclonal lymphoid hyperplasia, to B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL), i.e., malignant, presumably monoclonal B cell proliferations. To gain insight into the process of lymphomagenesis in AIDS and to investigate a possible pathogenetic relationship between LAS and NHL, we investigated (a) the clonality of the B or T lymphoid populations by Ig or T(β) gene rearrangement analysis, (b) the presence of rearrangements involving the c-myc oncogene locus, and (c) the presence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) sequences in both LAS and B-NHL biopsies. Our data indicate that multiple clonal B cell expansions are present in a significant percentage of LAS (~20%) and B-NHL (60%) biopsies. c-myc rearrangements/translocations are detectable in 9 of our 10 NHLs, but not in any of the LAS cases. However, only one of the B cell clones, identified by Ig gene rearrangements carries a c-myc gene rearrangement, suggesting that only one clone carries the genetic abnormality associated with malignant B cell lymphoma. Furthermore, the frequency of detection of c-myc rearrangements in AIDS-associated NHLs of both Burkitt and non-Burkitt type suggest that the biological alterations present in AIDS favor the development of lymphomas carrying activated c-myc oncogenes. Finally, our data show that HIV DNA sequences are not detectable in LAS nor in NHL B cell clones, suggesting that HIV does not play a direct role in NHL development. Taken together, these observations suggest a model of multistep lymphomagenesis in AIDS in which LAS would represent a predisposing condition to NHL. Immunosuppression and EBV infection present in LAS can favor the expansion of B cell clones, which in turn may increase the probability of occurrence of c-myc rearrangements leading to malignant transformation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2049-2060
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Experimental Medicine
Volume164
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 1986

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AIDS-Related Complex
myc Genes
Lymphoproliferative Disorders
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
B-Lymphocytes
B-Cell Lymphoma
Gene Rearrangement
Clone Cells
Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
HIV
Biopsy
Immunoglobulin Genes
Epstein-Barr Virus Infections
Immunosuppression
Hyperplasia
Lymphoma
Cell Proliferation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

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Multiple monoclonal B cell expansions and c-myc oncogene rearrangements in acquired immune deficiency syndrome-related lymphoproliferative disorders. Implications for lymphomagenesis. / Pelicci, P. G.; Knowles, D. M.; Arlin, Z. A.; Wieczorek, R.; Luciw, P.; Dina, D.; Basilico, C.; Dalla-Favera, R.

In: Journal of Experimental Medicine, Vol. 164, No. 6, 1986, p. 2049-2060.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pelicci, P. G. ; Knowles, D. M. ; Arlin, Z. A. ; Wieczorek, R. ; Luciw, P. ; Dina, D. ; Basilico, C. ; Dalla-Favera, R. / Multiple monoclonal B cell expansions and c-myc oncogene rearrangements in acquired immune deficiency syndrome-related lymphoproliferative disorders. Implications for lymphomagenesis. In: Journal of Experimental Medicine. 1986 ; Vol. 164, No. 6. pp. 2049-2060.
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AU - Pelicci, P. G.

AU - Knowles, D. M.

AU - Arlin, Z. A.

AU - Wieczorek, R.

AU - Luciw, P.

AU - Dina, D.

AU - Basilico, C.

AU - Dalla-Favera, R.

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