Murine models of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is an acquired clonal disorder characterized by chronic intravascular hemolysis, cytopenia, and an increased tendency to thrombosis. All patients with PNH studied so far have a somatic mutation of phosphatidyl inositol glycan complementation group A (PIG-A), an X-linked gene involved initially in the biosynthesis of the glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI) molecule, which serves as an anchor for many cell surface proteins. The mutation occurs in a hematopoietic stem cell, and consequently, all cells derived from the mutated stem cell are devoid of GPI-linked proteins. The absence of GPI-linked proteins explains some clinical symptoms of the disease but not the mechanism that allows the expansion of the mutated clone. By using targeted disruption of the PIG-A gene in mouse embryonic stem cells, some mice models of PNH have been generated. These animals have a discrete proportion of blood cells devoid of GPI-linked proteins, and although not anemic, they have evidence of hemolysis. The clinical course of these animals is benign, and there are no signs of a substantial expansion of the PNH clone, as observed in human patients. The fact that these animals do not develop the disease strongly supports the notion that a mutation of PIG-A is not sufficient per se to cause PNH and that another factor, namely, bone marrow failure, is necessary to allow proliferation and expansion of the PNH clone.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)290-296
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume963
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Paroxysmal Hemoglobinuria
Glycosylphosphatidylinositols
Phosphatidylinositols
Stem cells
Animals
Clone Cells
Genes
Hemolysis
Mutation
Proteins
Biosynthesis
Anchors
X-Linked Genes
Bone
Membrane Proteins
Blood
Cells
Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Molecules
Protein

Keywords

  • Cre/loxP
  • Knockout mice
  • Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria
  • Phosphatidyl inositol glycan complementation group A
  • PIG-A

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Murine models of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. / Rosti, Vittorio.

In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. 963, 2002, p. 290-296.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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