Mycobacterium iranicum sp. nov., a rapidly growing scotochromogenic species isolated from clinical specimens on three different continents

Hasan Shojaei, Charles Daley, Zoe Gitti, Abodolrazagh Hashemi, Parvin Heidarieh, Edward R B Moore, Abass Daei Naser, Cristina Russo, Jakko van Ingen, Enrico Tortoli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The isolation and characterization of a novel, rapidly growing, scotochromogenic mycobacterial species is reported. Eight independent strains were isolated from clinical specimens from six different countries of the world, two in Iran, two in Italy and one in each of following countries: Greece, the Netherlands, Sweden and the USA. Interestingly, two of the strains were isolated from cerebrospinal fluid. The strains were characterized by rapid growth and presented orangepigmented scotochromogenic colonies. DNA-based analysis revealed unique sequences in the four regions investigated: the 16S rRNA gene, the rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer 1 and the genes encoding the 65 kDa heat-shock protein and the beta-subunit of RNA polymerase. The phylogenetic analysis placed the strains among the rapidly growing mycobacteria, being most closely related to Mycobacterium gilvum. The genotypic and phenotypic data both strongly supported the inclusion of the strains investigated here as members of a novel species within the genus Mycobacterium; the name Mycobacterium iranicum sp. nov. is proposed to indicate the isolation in Iran of the first recognized strains. The type strain is M05T (=DSM 45541T=CCUG 62053T=JCM 17461T).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1383-1389
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology
Volume63
Issue numberPART4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

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