N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamic acid inhibits cellular recruitment and mediator release during the late allergen-induced nasal reaction

A. Miadonna, N. Milazzo, C. Salmaso, M. Cottini, M. Lorini, A. Tedeschi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamic acid (NAAGA) was effective in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, with an action on early allergen-induced nasal symptoms and mediator release. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical activity of NAAGA and its effects on the late antigen-induced reaction in the nose. Methods: Ten patients with allergic seasonal rhinitis were included in this randomized double-blind crossover trial of a 6% wt/vol solution of NAAGA (daily dosage 84 mg) versus placebo (lactose). The drug and placebo were administered intranasally five times daily for 1 week, with a 2- week interval between treatments. Results: Treatment with NAAGA, but not with placebo, significantly reduced the late antigen-induced nasal symptoms, mainly nasal obstruction Eosinophil numbers in the nasal lavages collected 6 h and 24 h after challenge were significantly lower after NAAGA than after placebo. Active treatment also significantly reduced the neutrophil count 6 h after antigen challenge, and significantly lowered eosinophil cationic protein and myeloperoxidase levels in nasal lavages 6 h and 24 h after antigen challenge. Conclusion: These results indicate that treatment for 1 week with NAAGA can reduce the late antigen-induced reaction in the nose. This is accompanied by a reduction in eosinophil and neutrophil recruitment and release of eosinophil cationic protein and myeloperoxidase.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)515-520
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
Volume54
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1998

Keywords

  • Allergic rhinitis
  • N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamic acid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

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