Nasal neutrophilia and eosinophilia induced by challenge with platelet activating factor

Alberto Tedeschi, Giuseppe Palumbo, Nunzio Milazzo, Antonio Miadonna

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: It has been demonstrated that in vitro platelet activating factor-acether (1-O-hexadecyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine; PAF) has the capacity to attract eosinophils and neutrophils. We investigated whether the same applies when human nasal airways are stimulated with PAF. Methods: Symptom scores and cytologic changes in nasal lavage fluids were evaluated in 10 atopic and 10 nonatopic subjects after nasal challenge with PAF, its precursor and metabolite, 1-O-hexadecyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine (lyso-PAF), or saline solution. Results: Nasal obstruction was reported by all the atopic subjects and seven of the 10 nonatopic subjects after nasal challenge with PAF; other symptoms such as rhinorrhea, itching, and sneezing were generally mild. PAF induced neutrophilia, which appeared after 30 minutes in atopic subjects and after 1 hour in nonatopic subjects, and peaked at 3 hours in both. Less neutrophilia was found 3 hours after stimulation with lyso-PAF in both groups of subjects. PAF also induced eosinophilia, which appeared after 30 minutes in atopic subjects and only after 3 hours in nonatopic subjects. An increase in eosinophil counts was observed 3 hours after lyso-PAF stimulation in atopic but not in nonatopic subjects. Conclusion: PAF can attract neutrophils and eosinophils into human nasal airways; however, the recruitment of inflammatory cells is more rapid in atopic than in nonatopic subjects, suggesting a different degree of responsiveness to PAF challenge in the two groups of subjects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)526-533
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume93
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1994

Fingerprint

Platelet Activating Factor
Eosinophilia
Nose
Eosinophils
Phosphorylcholine
Neutrophils
Nasal Lavage Fluid
Sneezing
Nasal Obstruction
Pruritus
Sodium Chloride
O-deacetyl platelet activating factor

Keywords

  • Allergic inflammation
  • eosinophils
  • lyso-PAF
  • nasal airways
  • neutrophils
  • platelet activating factor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Nasal neutrophilia and eosinophilia induced by challenge with platelet activating factor. / Tedeschi, Alberto; Palumbo, Giuseppe; Milazzo, Nunzio; Miadonna, Antonio.

In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol. 93, No. 2, 1994, p. 526-533.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tedeschi, Alberto ; Palumbo, Giuseppe ; Milazzo, Nunzio ; Miadonna, Antonio. / Nasal neutrophilia and eosinophilia induced by challenge with platelet activating factor. In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 1994 ; Vol. 93, No. 2. pp. 526-533.
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