Pressure support per via nasale (NPSV) in un caso di polmonite da Pneumocystis carinii in trapianto monopolmone.

Translated title of the contribution: Nasal pressure support ventilation (NPSV) in a case of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in single-lung transplantation

F. Rubini, S. Nava, G. Callegari, C. Fracchia, N. Ambrosino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In patients who underwent lung transplantation one of the primary determinants of patient survival is infection. Contributing factors in the development of pneumonia include immunosuppression and alterations in the natural lung defense mechanism induced by transplantation. We describe a case of a Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia occurring in the recipient of single lung transplantation for interstitial lung disease four months after surgery. The patient developed severe acute respiratory failure (ARF) requiring mechanical ventilation. Because of the increased infectious risk, tracheal intubation was avoided and pressure support ventilation was performed by the nasal route (NPSV) with PEEP (PS: 16 cm H2O PEEP: 8 cm H2O). NPSV and PEEP were applied 20-22 hours/day in the first 4 days, thereafter 2 to 6 hours 3 times a day, together with medical therapy. This treatment was performed for 15 days. This mode of ventilation was well tolerated and was successful. We conclude that NPSV may be useful in the treatment of ARF in patients with lung transplantation, particularly to avoid invasive mechanical ventilation related infectious complications.

Translated title of the contributionNasal pressure support ventilation (NPSV) in a case of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in single-lung transplantation
Original languageItalian
Pages (from-to)139-142
Number of pages4
JournalMinerva Anestesiologica
Volume60
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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