Nasal tip haemangiomas

Guidelines for an early surgical approach

Cynthia Hamou, Patrick A. Diner, Pietro Dalmonte, Nadia Vercellino, Véronique Soupre, Odile Enjolras, Marie Paule Vazquez, Arnaud Picard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The treatment of Cyrano nose haemangioma (CNH) is difficult because of its location and possible complications: psychological impact, severe skin infiltration and consequences on nasal growth. We suggest that the best treatment for nasal tip haemangiomas is an early surgery to remove the affected tissues and preserve the anatomy. A total of 39 children (32 females and seven males) underwent early surgery for the treatment of CNH. Mean age was 35 months. Skin infiltration was present in 15 cases. Cartilage lack or distortion was observed in 29 cases. Each patient was evaluated for global cosmetic appearance, reduction in volume of the tumour, improvement of skin texture and quality of the scar. Multiple surgical procedures were performed in 14 cases. The average postoperative follow-up was 48 months. Patients with low-volume tumours had only one surgery, whereas patients with large tumours underwent a mean of 1.9 surgeries. In 29 cases, distortion or lack of cartilaginous structures required dissection and approximation of the alar cartilages in their anatomical position. We could identify three types of CNH that lead to three distinct surgical approaches: type A (mild cases) is characterised by no cutaneous involvement, no misalignment of the cartilages and mild nasal volume increase; type B (moderate cases) entails partial cutaneous infiltration, misalignment of the cartilages and moderate nasal volume increase; and type C (severe cases) is characterised by cutaneous infiltration, misalignment of the cartilages and severe nasal volume increase.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)934-939
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery
Volume63
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2010

Fingerprint

Hemangioma
Nose
Nasal Cartilages
Guidelines
Skin
Tumor Burden
Cartilage
Cosmetics
Cicatrix
Dissection
Anatomy
Therapeutics
Psychology
Growth
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Haemangiomas
  • Nose
  • Rhinoplasty
  • Surgery
  • Vascular anomalies
  • Vascular tumour

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Nasal tip haemangiomas : Guidelines for an early surgical approach. / Hamou, Cynthia; Diner, Patrick A.; Dalmonte, Pietro; Vercellino, Nadia; Soupre, Véronique; Enjolras, Odile; Vazquez, Marie Paule; Picard, Arnaud.

In: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery, Vol. 63, No. 6, 06.2010, p. 934-939.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hamou, C, Diner, PA, Dalmonte, P, Vercellino, N, Soupre, V, Enjolras, O, Vazquez, MP & Picard, A 2010, 'Nasal tip haemangiomas: Guidelines for an early surgical approach', Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery, vol. 63, no. 6, pp. 934-939. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bjps.2009.05.020
Hamou, Cynthia ; Diner, Patrick A. ; Dalmonte, Pietro ; Vercellino, Nadia ; Soupre, Véronique ; Enjolras, Odile ; Vazquez, Marie Paule ; Picard, Arnaud. / Nasal tip haemangiomas : Guidelines for an early surgical approach. In: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery. 2010 ; Vol. 63, No. 6. pp. 934-939.
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