Native specific activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx-1), phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) does not differ between normo- and hypomotile human sperm samples

Federica Tramer, Luisa Caponecchia, Paolo Sgrò, Monica Martinelli, Gabriella Sandri, Enrico Panfili, Andrea Lenzi, Loredana Gandini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Glutathione-dependent selenoenzymes in human spermatozoa are responsible for a generalized protection against reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as some other metabolic and structural regulation during spermiogenesis and sperm cell maturation. Glutathione peroxidase (GPx-1), phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (GPx-4 or PHGPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) native specific activities have been studied in human Percoll-purified spermatozoa from healthy fertile subjects and asthenozoospermic patients. The mean values obtained for the three enzymes in normal specimens are 1.52 ± 0.90 mU/106 sperm cells (PHGPx), 4.26 ± 1.73 mU/106 sperm cells (GPx-1) and 1.95 mU/106 sperm cells (GR). No statistically significant differences for any of the three enzymes were encountered between these values and those of asthenozoospermic patients. These results are discussed and compared with recent literature data on both rescued and native PHGPx specific activity in human spermatozoa, as well as with data obtained for GPx in human seminal plasma.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)88-93
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Andrology
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2004

Keywords

  • Fertility
  • Glutathione peroxidase
  • Glutathione reductase
  • Human spermatozoa
  • Phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase
  • Sterility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology

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