Natural history of Chiari type I malformation in children

Luca Massimi, Massimo Caldarelli, Paolo Frassanito, Concezio Di Rocco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The decision on whether or not to operate children with Chiari type I malformation (CIM) is difficult and controversial, because of the lack of information about the natural evolution of such a disease. Herein, we report on the evolution of 16 asymptomatic children with incidentally diagnosed CIM (mean age: 6.7 years; mean follow-up: 5.8 years). No patients required suboccipital decompression. Thirteen children remained asymptomatic, with stable or improved radiological picture (worsening in 2 cases). Three cases showed appearance of symptoms: one did not require any treatment; the remaining two underwent endoscopic third ventriculostomy because of hydrocephalus, which is a possible consequence of CIM. This analysis shows a favorable natural outcome of CIM in children, thus suggesting a conservative management in asymptomatic cases. However, multicentric studies are required to validate this data.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-3
Number of pages3
JournalNeurological Sciences
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2011

Fingerprint

Arnold-Chiari Malformation
Ventriculostomy
Hydrocephalus
Decompression

Keywords

  • Asymptomatic patients
  • Cerebellar tonsils
  • Chiari I malformation
  • Natural history

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Dermatology

Cite this

Massimi, L., Caldarelli, M., Frassanito, P., & Di Rocco, C. (Accepted/In press). Natural history of Chiari type I malformation in children. Neurological Sciences, 1-3. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10072-011-0684-3

Natural history of Chiari type I malformation in children. / Massimi, Luca; Caldarelli, Massimo; Frassanito, Paolo; Di Rocco, Concezio.

In: Neurological Sciences, 2011, p. 1-3.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Massimi, Luca ; Caldarelli, Massimo ; Frassanito, Paolo ; Di Rocco, Concezio. / Natural history of Chiari type I malformation in children. In: Neurological Sciences. 2011 ; pp. 1-3.
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