Near-infrared fundus autofluorescence alterations correlate with swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography findings in patients with retinitis pigmentosa

Marco Nassisi, Carlo Lavia, Saddek Mohand-Said, Vasily Smirnov, Aline Antonio, Christel Condroyer, Serge Sancho, Juliette Varin, Alain Gaudric, Christina Zeitz, José Alain Sahel, Isabelle Audo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Thirty-eight patients from 37 families with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) underwent macular 6 × 6-mm swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography (SS-OCTA) and 30° near-infrared fundus autofluorescence (NIR-FAF) acquisitions in one eye. Superficial vascular complex (SVC), deep capillary complex (DCC) and choriocapillaris (CC) angiograms were registered with NIR-FAF acquisitions to comparatively assess subjects with and without central area of preserved NIR-FAF (APA). On the subset of patients showing an APA, the vessel densities for SVC and DCC and flow deficits for CC were assessed in three directions (superior, inferior and temporal) from the fovea and compared to healthy 1:1 age-matched controls. Nine patients with no APA had evidence of severe central OCTA alterations at all levels, especially in the DCC. In the other 29 subjects presenting APA, all OCTA parameters were similar to healthy eyes within the APA, where the retina preserves its structural integrity. Outside the APA, both the DCC and CC were significantly reduced in all directions. These alterations are probably related to the outer retinal atrophy outside the APA. Comparing OCTA to other imaging modalities is helpful to determine the potential interest of OCTA findings as an outcome measure for disease status and progression.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3180
JournalScientific Reports
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2021
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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