Near infrared spectroscopy of the human brain: Effects of apnea and hypercapnia on the intensity and phase of back-scattered light

Nicola Rosato, Fabrizio Vernieri, Francesco Tibuzzi, Francesco Passarelli, Alessandro Finazzi Agrò, Paolo Maria Fasella, Flavia Pauri, Paolo Maria Rossini

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The effects of hypercapnia on the intensity and phase of near infrared light back-scattered by the head were studied on eight healthy humans and two patients affected by monohemispheric lesions in the Middle Cerebral Artery (MCA) territory. A decrease in the light intensity and a variation of the phase were detected in all healthy subjects during apnea and hypercapnia. Only negligible changes were observed in the affected hemisphere of the patients. A concomitant study by Transcranial Doppler Sonography (TCD) showed an increase of the blood flow during hypercapnia both in normal hemispheres and, to a less extent, in the affected hemisphere of patients. This suggests that NIRS (Near Infrared Spectroscopy) is more sensitive to alterations of more cortical brain vascular system than TCD which is mainly testing MCA in the depth.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
EditorsD.A.M.D. Benaron, B. Chance, M. Ferrari, A. Katzir
Pages34-41
Number of pages8
Volume3194
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1997
EventProceedings of Photon Propagation in Tissues III - San Remo, Italy
Duration: Sep 6 1997Sep 8 1997

Other

OtherProceedings of Photon Propagation in Tissues III
Country/TerritoryItaly
CitySan Remo
Period9/6/979/8/97

Keywords

  • Apnea
  • Hypercapnia
  • NIRS (Near Infrared Spectroscopy)
  • Phase Delay
  • TCD(Transcranial Doppler Sonography)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

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