Neck pain treatment with acupuncture: Does the number of needles matter?

Francesco Ceccherelli, Luigi Gioioso, Roberto Casale, Giuseppe Gagliardi, Carlo Ori

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: Acupuncture has been successfully used in myofascial pain syndromes. However, the number of needles used, that is, the dose of acupuncture stimulation, to obtain the best antinociceptive efficacy is still a matter of debate. The question was addressed comparing the clinical efficacy of two different therapeutic schemes, characterized by a different number of needles used on 36 patients between 29-60 years of age with by a painful cervical myofascial syndrome. Methods: Patients were divided into two groups; the first group of 18 patients were treated with 5 needles and the second group of 18 patients were treated with 11 needles, the time of needle stimulation was the same in both groups: 100 seconds. Each group underwent six cycles of somatic acupuncture. Pain intensity was evaluated before, immediately after and 1 and 3 months after the treatment by means of both the Mc Gill Pain Questionnaire and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). In both groups, the needles were fixed superficially excluding the two most painful trigger points where they were deeply inserted. Results: Both groups, independently from the number of needles used, obtained a good therapeutic effect without clinically relevant differences. Conclusions: For this pathology, the number of needles, 5 or 11, seems not to be an important variable in determining the therapeutic effect when the time of stimulation is the same in the two groups.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)807-812
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Journal of Pain
Volume26
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2010

Fingerprint

Acupuncture Therapy
Neck Pain
Needles
Acupuncture
Therapeutic Uses
Myofascial Pain Syndromes
Trigger Points
Pain Measurement
Pathology
Pain

Keywords

  • acupuncture
  • blind
  • controlled study
  • neck pain
  • needle
  • number
  • randomized

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Ceccherelli, F., Gioioso, L., Casale, R., Gagliardi, G., & Ori, C. (2010). Neck pain treatment with acupuncture: Does the number of needles matter? Clinical Journal of Pain, 26(9), 807-812. https://doi.org/10.1097/AJP.0b013e3181e375c9

Neck pain treatment with acupuncture : Does the number of needles matter? / Ceccherelli, Francesco; Gioioso, Luigi; Casale, Roberto; Gagliardi, Giuseppe; Ori, Carlo.

In: Clinical Journal of Pain, Vol. 26, No. 9, 11.2010, p. 807-812.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ceccherelli, F, Gioioso, L, Casale, R, Gagliardi, G & Ori, C 2010, 'Neck pain treatment with acupuncture: Does the number of needles matter?', Clinical Journal of Pain, vol. 26, no. 9, pp. 807-812. https://doi.org/10.1097/AJP.0b013e3181e375c9
Ceccherelli, Francesco ; Gioioso, Luigi ; Casale, Roberto ; Gagliardi, Giuseppe ; Ori, Carlo. / Neck pain treatment with acupuncture : Does the number of needles matter?. In: Clinical Journal of Pain. 2010 ; Vol. 26, No. 9. pp. 807-812.
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