Nerve growth factor is an autocrine factor essential for the survival of macrophages infected with HIV

Enrico Garaci, Maria Cristina Caroleo, Luigi Aloe, Stefano Aquaro, Mauro Piacentini, Nicola Costa, Alessandra Amendola, Alessandra Micera, Raffaele Caliò, Carlo Federico Perno, Rita Levi-Montalcini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a neurotrophin with the ability to exert specific effects on cells of the immune system. Human monocytes/macrophages (M/M) infected in vitro with HIV type 1 (HIV-1) are able to produce substantial levels of NGF that are associated with enhanced expression of the high-affinity NGF receptor (p140 trkA) on the M/M surface. Treatment of HIV- infected human M/M with anti-NGF Ab blocking the biological activity of NGF leads to a marked decrease of the expression of p140 trkA high-affinity receptor, a concomitant increased expression of p75(NTR) low-affinity receptor for NGF, and the occurrence of apoptotic death of M/M. Taken together, these findings suggest a role for NGF as an autocrine survival factor that rescues human M/M from the cytopathic effect caused by HIV infection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)14013-14018
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume96
Issue number24
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 23 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • General

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Nerve growth factor is an autocrine factor essential for the survival of macrophages infected with HIV'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this