Neural correlates of focused attention and cognitive monitoring in meditation

Antonietta Manna, Antonino Raffone, Mauro Gianni Perrucci, Davide Nardo, Antonio Ferretti, Armando Tartaro, Alessandro Londei, Cosimo Del Gratta, Marta Olivetti Belardinelli, Gian Luca Romani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Meditation refers to a family of complex emotional and attentional regulatory practices, which can be classified into two main styles - focused attention (FA) and open monitoring (OM) - involving different attentional, cognitive monitoring and awareness processes. In a functional magnetic resonance study we originally characterized and contrasted FA and OM meditation forms within the same experiment, by an integrated FA-OM design. Theravada Buddhist monks, expert in both FA and OM meditation forms, and lay novices with 10 days of meditation practice, participated in the experiment. Our evidence suggests that expert meditators control cognitive engagement in conscious processing of sensory-related, thought and emotion contents, by massive self-regulation of fronto-parietal and insular areas in the left hemisphere, in a meditation state-dependent fashion. We also found that anterior cingulate and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices play antagonist roles in the executive control of the attention setting in meditation tasks. Our findings resolve the controversy between the hypothesis that meditative states are associated to transient hypofrontality or deactivation of executive brain areas, and evidence about the activation of executive brain areas in meditation. Finally, our study suggests that a functional reorganization of brain activity patterns for focused attention and cognitive monitoring takes place with mental practice, and that meditation-related neuroplasticity is crucially associated to a functional reorganization of activity patterns in prefrontal cortex and in the insula.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)46-56
Number of pages11
JournalBrain Research Bulletin
Volume82
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2010

Fingerprint

Meditation
Prefrontal Cortex
Brain
Neuronal Plasticity
Gyrus Cinguli
Executive Function
Emotions
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

Keywords

  • Attention
  • Cognitive control
  • Consciousness
  • Meditation
  • Prefrontal cortex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Manna, A., Raffone, A., Perrucci, M. G., Nardo, D., Ferretti, A., Tartaro, A., ... Romani, G. L. (2010). Neural correlates of focused attention and cognitive monitoring in meditation. Brain Research Bulletin, 82(1-2), 46-56. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brainresbull.2010.03.001

Neural correlates of focused attention and cognitive monitoring in meditation. / Manna, Antonietta; Raffone, Antonino; Perrucci, Mauro Gianni; Nardo, Davide; Ferretti, Antonio; Tartaro, Armando; Londei, Alessandro; Del Gratta, Cosimo; Belardinelli, Marta Olivetti; Romani, Gian Luca.

In: Brain Research Bulletin, Vol. 82, No. 1-2, 04.2010, p. 46-56.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Manna, A, Raffone, A, Perrucci, MG, Nardo, D, Ferretti, A, Tartaro, A, Londei, A, Del Gratta, C, Belardinelli, MO & Romani, GL 2010, 'Neural correlates of focused attention and cognitive monitoring in meditation', Brain Research Bulletin, vol. 82, no. 1-2, pp. 46-56. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brainresbull.2010.03.001
Manna, Antonietta ; Raffone, Antonino ; Perrucci, Mauro Gianni ; Nardo, Davide ; Ferretti, Antonio ; Tartaro, Armando ; Londei, Alessandro ; Del Gratta, Cosimo ; Belardinelli, Marta Olivetti ; Romani, Gian Luca. / Neural correlates of focused attention and cognitive monitoring in meditation. In: Brain Research Bulletin. 2010 ; Vol. 82, No. 1-2. pp. 46-56.
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