Neuroeffector functions of sensory fibres: implications for headache mechanisms and drug actions

M. A. Moskowitz, M. G. Buzzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

86 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The results of recent investigations designed to elucidate the neuroeffector functions of sensory fibres, the cause of migraine headache and the mechanism of action of antimigraine drugs are reviewed and discussed. Neurogenic inflammation (vasodilatation and neurogenic plasma extravasation) is one explanation for the development of headaches and the blood flow changes which occur during migraine headache. Numerous studies have recently been carried out on rats and guinea-pigs into the effects of antimigraine agents, including ergot alkaloids, sumatriptan and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), on neurogenic plasma protein extravasation in the dura mater induced by electrical stimulation of trigeminal ganglia or systemic administration of capsaicin. It is known that the dura mater is able to produce headaches in man. Ergot alkaloids have been shown to block neurogenic inflammation via a C-fibre dependent neuronal mechanism. Sumatriptan appears to act fairly similarly although, whereas the ergot alkaloids are non-selective for either 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) receptors or 5-HT1, sumatriptan is selective for 5-HT1 receptors. The antimigraine action of NSAIDs may be via either an effect on blood vessels or an effect on the nerve fibre. The antimigraine effects of ergot alkaloids, sumatriptan and NSAIDs are discussed in the light of the common vasoconstrictor actions of these agents and knowledge that vasodilatation is apparently not responsible for migraine headache pain in most cases.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Neurology
Volume238
Issue number1 Supplement
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1991

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Ergot Alkaloids
Sumatriptan
Headache
Migraine Disorders
Neurogenic Inflammation
Dura Mater
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Serotonin Receptors
Vasodilation
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Serotonin 5-HT1 Receptors
Trigeminal Ganglion
Unmyelinated Nerve Fibers
Capsaicin
Vasoconstrictor Agents
Nerve Fibers
Electric Stimulation
Blood Vessels
Blood Proteins
Serotonin

Keywords

  • Antimigraine drugs
  • Neurogenic inflammation
  • Plasma extravasation
  • Vasodilatation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Neuroeffector functions of sensory fibres : implications for headache mechanisms and drug actions. / Moskowitz, M. A.; Buzzi, M. G.

In: Journal of Neurology, Vol. 238, No. 1 Supplement, 02.1991.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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