Neurologic abnormalities in two patients with facial hemiatrophy and sclerosis coexisting with morphea

Silvano Menni, Angelo Valerio Marzano, Emanuela Passoni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Progressive facial hemiatrophy or Perry-Romberg syndrome is a rare entity characterized by unilateral atrophy of the skin, subcutaneous tissue, end the underlying bony structures. This syndrome has many features of linear scleroderma en coup de sabre but is distinguished by more extensive involvement of the lower face end by only slight cutaneous sclerosis. We describe two unusual children with both etrophic and sclerotic changes of half of the face coexisting with multiple plaques of typical morphea. Both children developed neurologic disturbances with cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities 2 years and 15 years, respectively, after the onset of cutaneous lesions. Thus considering that it may not be possible to correlate impairment in neurologic function and cutaneous disease, as illustrated by our patients, we emphasize the importance of an accurate follow-up.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)113-116
Number of pages4
JournalPediatric Dermatology
Volume14
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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