Neuropsychological implications of adjunctive levetiracetam in childhood epilepsy

Annio Posar, Grazia Salerno, Morena Monti, Margherita Santucci, Maria Scaduto, Antonia Parmeggiani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Levetiracetam (LEV) is an effective antiepileptic drug also used in childhood and adolescence. Literature data regarding the long-term effects of LEV in childhood epilepsy and based on extensive neuropsychological evaluations using standardized tools are still scanty. Our study aimed to address this topic. Materials and Methods: We studied 10 patients with epilepsy characterized by focal or generalized seizures (4 boys, 6 girls; mean age: 10 years 8 months; range: 6 years 2 months - 16 years 2 months), treated with adjunctive LEV during a follow-up of 12 months. In 6 patients electroencephalogram (EEG) showed continuous spike and waves during sleep. Using standardized tools, we performed seriated assessments of cognitive and behavioral functioning in relation to seizure and EEG outcome. Results: Six patients completed the trial after 12 months of treatment; 1 patient dropped out of the study after 9 months, 3 patients after 6 months. Adjunctive LEV was effective on seizures in 3/10 patients and on EEG in 2/10 patients, and was well tolerated in all examined cases. Overall, no worsening of cognitive or behavioral functions has been detected during the period of the study; even at 6 and 12 months from baseline, an improvement in patients′ abstract reasoning has been found, that was not related to seizure or EEG outcome. Conclusions: In our population of children and adolescents, LEV had no adverse cognitive or behavioral effects, short- or long-term. We found an improvement of abstract reasoning, regardless of seizure and EEG outcome.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)115-120
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Pediatric Neurosciences
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2014

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etiracetam
Epilepsy
Seizures
Electroencephalography

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • antiepileptic drugs
  • behavior
  • childhood
  • cognitive functions
  • electroencephalogram
  • epilepsy
  • levetiracetam

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Neuropsychological implications of adjunctive levetiracetam in childhood epilepsy. / Posar, Annio; Salerno, Grazia; Monti, Morena; Santucci, Margherita; Scaduto, Maria; Parmeggiani, Antonia.

In: Journal of Pediatric Neurosciences, Vol. 9, No. 2, 01.07.2014, p. 115-120.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Posar, Annio ; Salerno, Grazia ; Monti, Morena ; Santucci, Margherita ; Scaduto, Maria ; Parmeggiani, Antonia. / Neuropsychological implications of adjunctive levetiracetam in childhood epilepsy. In: Journal of Pediatric Neurosciences. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 2. pp. 115-120.
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