Neutralizing antibodies against autologous human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates in patients with increasing CD4 cell counts despite incomplete virus suppression during antiretroviral treatment

L. Sarmati, G. D'Ettorre, E. Nicastri, L. Ercoli, I. Uccella, P. Massetti, S. G. Parisi, V. Vullo, M. Andreoni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Antiretroviral-treated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1-seropositive individuals can remain clinically stable for a long period of time with an increasing CD4 cell count irrespective of incomplete viral suppression. We evaluated the role of neutralizing antibody (NtAb) activity in the etiopathogenesis of this viro-immunological disconnection (defined as an increasing CD4+-cell count despite a persistent, detectable viral load during antiretroviral therapy) in 33 patients failing therapy with two analogue nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. An HIV NtAb titer of ≥1:25 was detected in specimens from 16 out of 33 (48%) patients. A significant correlation was found between NtAb titers and CD4+-cell counts (P = 0.001; r = 0.546) but not with HIV RNA levels in plasma. Five patients with a viro-immunological disconnection had an NtAb titer of > 1:125, statistically higher than the NtAb titers for the remaining 28 patients with both virologic and immunologic failure (P <0.0001). The HIV-specific humoral immune response could play a role during antiretroviral treatment to improve immunological function despite an incomplete suppression of viral load.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)822-824
Number of pages3
JournalClinical and Diagnostic Laboratory Immunology
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Immunology

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