New beta-lactamases

a paradigm for the rapid response of bacterial evolution in the clinical setting.

Gian Maria Rossolini, Jean Denis Docquier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Production of beta-lactamases is one of the most common mechanisms of bacterial resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. In the clinical setting, the introduction of new classes of beta-lactams has invariably been followed by the emergence of new beta-lactamases capable of degrading them, as a paradigmatic example of rapid bacterial evolution under a rapidly changing selective environment. The scope of this article is to provide an overview on the recent evolution of beta-lactamase-mediated resistance among bacterial pathogens. Focus is on the mechanisms of evolution and dissemination of enzymes of greater clinical impact, including the extended-spectrum beta-lactamases, the AmpC-type beta-lactamases and the carbapenemases, which are currently responsible for emerging resistance to the most recent and powerful beta-lactams (the expanded-spectrum cephalosporins and the carbapenems) among major Gram-negative pathogens such as Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)295-308
Number of pages14
JournalFuture Microbiology
Volume1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2006

Fingerprint

beta-Lactamases
beta-Lactams
beta-Lactam Resistance
Acinetobacter
Carbapenems
Enterobacteriaceae
Cephalosporins
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Enzymes
AmpC beta-lactamases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

New beta-lactamases : a paradigm for the rapid response of bacterial evolution in the clinical setting. / Rossolini, Gian Maria; Docquier, Jean Denis.

In: Future Microbiology, Vol. 1, 10.2006, p. 295-308.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rossolini, Gian Maria ; Docquier, Jean Denis. / New beta-lactamases : a paradigm for the rapid response of bacterial evolution in the clinical setting. In: Future Microbiology. 2006 ; Vol. 1. pp. 295-308.
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