New insights on non-enzymatic glycosylation may lead to therapeutic approaches for the prevention of diabetic complications

A. Ceriello, A. Quatraro, D. Giugliano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

124 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is generally accepted that chronic hyperglycaemia is responsible for most of the long-term complications of diabetes. Several studies suggest that accelerated non-enzymatic glycosylation may be the underlying mechanism by which hyperglycaemia causes complications. More recently, glucose auto-oxidation has been linked to non-enzymatic glycosylation, and glycosylated proteins have been shown to be a source of free radicals. These findings suggest the possibility that oxidative stress may be related to the development of diabetic complications. Anti-oxidants such as vitamins C and E have recently been demonstrated to reduce protein glycosylation both in vivo and in vitro. In addition they also act as scavengers of free radicals generated by non-enzymatic glycosylation of protein. These findings may lead to new therapeutic approaches for the prevention of complications by limiting the damage caused by non-enzymatic glycosylation and oxidant stress. Such therapies may also be useful in complementing existing treatment in those with the long-term complications of diabetes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)297-299
Number of pages3
JournalDiabetic Medicine
Volume9
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1992

Fingerprint

Diabetes Complications
Glycosylation
Oxidants
Hyperglycemia
Therapeutics
Free Radical Scavengers
Vitamin E
Ascorbic Acid
Free Radicals
Oxidative Stress
Glucose

Keywords

  • Antioxidants
  • Glycosylation
  • Oxidative stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

New insights on non-enzymatic glycosylation may lead to therapeutic approaches for the prevention of diabetic complications. / Ceriello, A.; Quatraro, A.; Giugliano, D.

In: Diabetic Medicine, Vol. 9, No. 3, 1992, p. 297-299.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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