Nissen fundoplication and combined procedures to reduce recurrence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in neurologically impaired children

Emanuela Ceriati, P. Marchetti, R. Caccamo, O. Adorisio, F. Rivosecchi, F. De Peppo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Neurologically impaired children account for almost half of the fundoplication procedures performed for gastroesophageal reflux disease. Aim of the present study was to report results of antireflux surgery in neurologically impaired children. A retrospective study of neurologically impaired children who underwent fundoplication over a 13-year period (1999–2012) was performed. Recurrence rate, major complications and parents/caregivers perceptions of their child's quality of life following antireflux surgery were analyzed. A total of 122 children (median age: 8 years 9 months; range: 3 months to 18 years) had open “tension-free” Nissen fundoplication, gastrostomy + /− pyloroplasty. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was in all cases documented by at least two diagnostic exams. Median duration of follow-up was 9.7 (1.9–13) years. Three (2.4%) recurrences were documented and required surgery re-do. Major complications were 6%. Seventy-nine of 87 (90%) caregivers reported that weight gain was improved after fundoplication with a median score of 1 (IQR: 1–2). Significant improvement was perceived in postoperative overall quality of life. In this series of fundoplication recurrence incidence was low, serious complications were uncommon and caregivers’ satisfaction with surgery was high. Accurate patient’s selection and creating a “low-pressure” surgical system are mandatory to obtain these results.

Original languageEnglish
Article number11618
JournalScientific Reports
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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