Nitric oxide and mitochondrial biogenesis: A key to long-term regulation of cellular metabolism

Emilio Clementi, Enzo Nisoli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Mitochondria, the site of oxidative energy metabolism in eukariotic cells, are a highly organised structure endowed with different enzymes and reactions localized in discrete membranes and aqueous compartments. Mitochondrial function is regulated in complex ways by several agonists and environmental conditions, through activation of specific transcription factors and signalling pathways. A key player in this scenario is nitric oxide (NO). Its binding to cytochrome c oxidase in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, which is reversible and in competition with oxygen, plays a role in acute oxygen sensing and in the cell response to hypoxia. Evidence of the last two years showed that NO has also long-term effects, leading to biogenesis of functionally active mitochondria, that complement its oxygen sensing function. Mitochondrial biogenesis is triggered by NO through activation of guanylate cyclase and generation of cyclic GMP, and yields formation of functionally active mitochondria. Thus, the combined action of NO at its two known intracellular receptors, cytochrome c oxidase and guanylate cyclase, appears to play a role in coupling energy generation with energy demand. This may explain why dysregulation of the NO signalling pathway is often associated with the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)102-110
Number of pages9
JournalComparative Biochemistry and Physiology - A Molecular and Integrative Physiology
Volume142
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2005

Fingerprint

Organelle Biogenesis
Metabolism
Nitric Oxide
Mitochondria
Guanylate Cyclase
Electron Transport Complex IV
Oxygen
Chemical activation
Cyclic GMP
Electron Transport
Energy Metabolism
Transcription Factors
Membranes
Enzymes

Keywords

  • Cyclic GMP
  • Gene transcription
  • Hypoxia
  • Metabolism
  • Mitochondria
  • Mitochondrial biogenesis
  • Nitric oxide
  • Respiration
  • Thermogenesis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Physiology

Cite this

Nitric oxide and mitochondrial biogenesis : A key to long-term regulation of cellular metabolism. / Clementi, Emilio; Nisoli, Enzo.

In: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - A Molecular and Integrative Physiology, Vol. 142, No. 2, 10.2005, p. 102-110.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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