No difference in gait recovery after THA with different head diameters: A prospective randomized study

Luigi Zagra, Federica Anasetti, Luca Bianchi, Vittorio Licari, Roberto Giacometti Ceroni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Larger femoral heads are commonly presumed to improve joint stability and hip biomechanics; some studies have suggested they may hasten recovery of a normal gait. To our knowledge, no gait analysis studies have compared different size head diameters in THA. Questions/purposes: We compared (1) spatiotemporal gait parameters, (2) kinematic and kinetic gait parameters, and (3) Harris hip scores in patients undergoing THA randomized to receive a 28-, 36-, or ≥ 42-mm bearing couple. We hypothesized a larger femoral head would restore an earlier, more physiologic gait pattern. Methods: This randomized, blinded study involved 60 patients who received the same cementless THA except for the size of the bearing. Inclusion criteria were primary hip arthritis, female sex, and age between 55 and 70 years. Exclusion criteria were other problems influencing walking ability. The patients were randomized into three groups of 20 each (28- and 36-mm ceramic-on-crosslinked polyethylene, ≥ 42-mm metal-on-metal). All patients underwent the same postoperative rehabilitation protocol. Gait evaluation using an optoelectronic system was performed preoperatively and at 2 and 4 months postoperatively. Results: With the numbers available, no differences in spatiotemporal gait parameters, kinematic or kinetic gait parameters, or Harris hip scores emerged among the three groups. All variables assessed at 4 months postoperatively showed improvements across all groups, but the differences among them were not significant. Conclusions: The hypothesis that a larger femoral head results in improved early gait performance was not supported by this study. Level of Evidence: Level I, therapeutic study. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3830-3837
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Orthopaedics and Related Research
Volume471
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2013

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Tacrine
Gait
Head
Prospective Studies
Thigh
Biomechanical Phenomena
Hip
Metals
Hip Joint
Ceramics
Polyethylene
Walking
Arthritis
Rehabilitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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No difference in gait recovery after THA with different head diameters : A prospective randomized study. / Zagra, Luigi; Anasetti, Federica; Bianchi, Luca; Licari, Vittorio; Giacometti Ceroni, Roberto.

In: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, Vol. 471, No. 12, 12.2013, p. 3830-3837.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zagra, Luigi ; Anasetti, Federica ; Bianchi, Luca ; Licari, Vittorio ; Giacometti Ceroni, Roberto. / No difference in gait recovery after THA with different head diameters : A prospective randomized study. In: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2013 ; Vol. 471, No. 12. pp. 3830-3837.
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