No gender differences in egocentric and allocentric environmental transformation after compensating for male advantage by manipulating familiarity

Raffaella Nori, Laura Piccardi, Andrea Maialetti, Mirco Goro, Andrea Rossetti, Ornella Argento, Cecilia Guariglia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The present study has two-fold aims: to investigate whether gender differences persist even when more time is given to acquire spatial information; to assess the gender effect when the retrieval phase requires recalling the pathway from the same or a different reference perspective (egocentric or allocentric). Specifically, we analyse the performance of men and women while learning a path from a map or by observing an experimenter in a real environment. We then asked them to reproduce the learned path using the same reference system (map learning vs. map retrieval or real environment learning vs. real environment retrieval) or using a different reference system (map learning vs. real environment retrieval or vice versa). The results showed that gender differences were not present in the retrieval phase when women have the necessary time to acquire spatial information. Moreover, using the egocentric coordinates (both in the learning and retrieval phase) proved easier than the other conditions, whereas learning through allocentric coordinates and then retrieving the environmental information using egocentric coordinates proved to be the most difficult. Results showed that by manipulating familiarity, gender differences disappear, or are attenuated in all conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Article number204
JournalFrontiers in Neuroscience
Volume12
Issue numberMAR
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 28 2018

Keywords

  • Allocentric frames of reference
  • Change of perspective
  • Egocentric frames of reference
  • Gender differences
  • Learning time

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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