Nocturnal sleep study in multiple sclerosis: Correlations with clinical and brain magnetic resonance imaging findings

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

130 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It has been suggested that sleep disturbances in multiple sclerosis (MS) may be related to periodic leg movements (PLM) during sleep, but to date polysomnographic studies were conducted only on small and unselected patient groups. Aim of this study was to evaluate 8-hour polysomnography in MS patients and to correlate sleep results with clinical and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. Twenty-five clinically definite MS patients, without mood disorders and drug-free, entered the study. The patients were compared to 25 age-and sex-matched subjects. MS patients had significantly reduced sleep efficiency and experienced more awakenings during sleep. No difference was found in sleep architecture parameters between MS patients and controls. PLM was found in 9 patients (36%) and 2 controls (8%; p = 0.02). Of the six patients who complained of insomnia two had PLM and 2 others presented with PLM and central sleep apnea. In patients with PLM greater MRI lesion loads were detected in the infratentorial regions, particularly in cerebellum and brainstem. Larger studies in neurological diseases that produce focal lesions in these brain areas could provide useful information on the PLM pathogenesis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)194-197
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the Neurological Sciences
Volume125
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1994

Fingerprint

Multiple Sclerosis
Sleep
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Leg
Brain
Central Sleep Apnea
Polysomnography
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Mood Disorders
Cerebellum
Brain Stem
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Brain magnetic resonance imaging
  • Insomnia
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Periodic leg movements

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ageing
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Neurology

Cite this

@article{25afe64e59924a07beeb4d75534b0bd9,
title = "Nocturnal sleep study in multiple sclerosis: Correlations with clinical and brain magnetic resonance imaging findings",
abstract = "It has been suggested that sleep disturbances in multiple sclerosis (MS) may be related to periodic leg movements (PLM) during sleep, but to date polysomnographic studies were conducted only on small and unselected patient groups. Aim of this study was to evaluate 8-hour polysomnography in MS patients and to correlate sleep results with clinical and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. Twenty-five clinically definite MS patients, without mood disorders and drug-free, entered the study. The patients were compared to 25 age-and sex-matched subjects. MS patients had significantly reduced sleep efficiency and experienced more awakenings during sleep. No difference was found in sleep architecture parameters between MS patients and controls. PLM was found in 9 patients (36{\%}) and 2 controls (8{\%}; p = 0.02). Of the six patients who complained of insomnia two had PLM and 2 others presented with PLM and central sleep apnea. In patients with PLM greater MRI lesion loads were detected in the infratentorial regions, particularly in cerebellum and brainstem. Larger studies in neurological diseases that produce focal lesions in these brain areas could provide useful information on the PLM pathogenesis.",
keywords = "Brain magnetic resonance imaging, Insomnia, Multiple sclerosis, Periodic leg movements",
author = "Luigi Ferini-Strambi and Massimo Filippi and Vittorio Martinelli and Alessandro Oldani and Marco Rovaris and Marco Zucconi and Giancarlo Comi and Salvatore Smirne",
year = "1994",
doi = "10.1016/0022-510X(94)90035-3",
language = "English",
volume = "125",
pages = "194--197",
journal = "Journal of the Neurological Sciences",
issn = "0022-510X",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Nocturnal sleep study in multiple sclerosis

T2 - Correlations with clinical and brain magnetic resonance imaging findings

AU - Ferini-Strambi, Luigi

AU - Filippi, Massimo

AU - Martinelli, Vittorio

AU - Oldani, Alessandro

AU - Rovaris, Marco

AU - Zucconi, Marco

AU - Comi, Giancarlo

AU - Smirne, Salvatore

PY - 1994

Y1 - 1994

N2 - It has been suggested that sleep disturbances in multiple sclerosis (MS) may be related to periodic leg movements (PLM) during sleep, but to date polysomnographic studies were conducted only on small and unselected patient groups. Aim of this study was to evaluate 8-hour polysomnography in MS patients and to correlate sleep results with clinical and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. Twenty-five clinically definite MS patients, without mood disorders and drug-free, entered the study. The patients were compared to 25 age-and sex-matched subjects. MS patients had significantly reduced sleep efficiency and experienced more awakenings during sleep. No difference was found in sleep architecture parameters between MS patients and controls. PLM was found in 9 patients (36%) and 2 controls (8%; p = 0.02). Of the six patients who complained of insomnia two had PLM and 2 others presented with PLM and central sleep apnea. In patients with PLM greater MRI lesion loads were detected in the infratentorial regions, particularly in cerebellum and brainstem. Larger studies in neurological diseases that produce focal lesions in these brain areas could provide useful information on the PLM pathogenesis.

AB - It has been suggested that sleep disturbances in multiple sclerosis (MS) may be related to periodic leg movements (PLM) during sleep, but to date polysomnographic studies were conducted only on small and unselected patient groups. Aim of this study was to evaluate 8-hour polysomnography in MS patients and to correlate sleep results with clinical and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. Twenty-five clinically definite MS patients, without mood disorders and drug-free, entered the study. The patients were compared to 25 age-and sex-matched subjects. MS patients had significantly reduced sleep efficiency and experienced more awakenings during sleep. No difference was found in sleep architecture parameters between MS patients and controls. PLM was found in 9 patients (36%) and 2 controls (8%; p = 0.02). Of the six patients who complained of insomnia two had PLM and 2 others presented with PLM and central sleep apnea. In patients with PLM greater MRI lesion loads were detected in the infratentorial regions, particularly in cerebellum and brainstem. Larger studies in neurological diseases that produce focal lesions in these brain areas could provide useful information on the PLM pathogenesis.

KW - Brain magnetic resonance imaging

KW - Insomnia

KW - Multiple sclerosis

KW - Periodic leg movements

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0027990485&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0027990485&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0022-510X(94)90035-3

DO - 10.1016/0022-510X(94)90035-3

M3 - Article

C2 - 7807167

AN - SCOPUS:0027990485

VL - 125

SP - 194

EP - 197

JO - Journal of the Neurological Sciences

JF - Journal of the Neurological Sciences

SN - 0022-510X

IS - 2

ER -