Non-interventional surveillance study of adverse events in patients with epilepsy

J. A. Cramer, B. Steinborn, P. Striano, L. Hlinkova, A. Bergmann, I. Bacos, C. Baukens, S. Buyle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives- Compare adverse events (AEs) in patients with epilepsy taking different antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) using standardized physician-completed questionnaires. Materials and methods- Multicenter, observational, cross-sectional study in epilepsy patients aged ≥4, stable on 1-2 AED(s) for ≥3months. Results- One thousand and nineteen patients were evaluated: 28.7% took newer, 71.3% older (or older+newer) AED(s); 56.9% monotherapy; 43.1% polytherapy. Overall, 68.3% reported ≥1 AE (61.3% newer; 71.1% older AEDs), most commonly: cognitive function disturbances, sedation, psychological problems. Patients taking newer AEDs were significantly less likely to report ≥1 AE (OR [95% CI]: 0.64 [0.46-0.89], P=0.008). Treatment/dose changed at study visit: 22.8% (17.5% newer; 24.9% older AEDs) because of (newer/older); lack of efficacy (6.2%/7.8%); AEs (4.1/8.4%); absence of seizures (3.8/4.0%). Patients receiving levetiracetam or lamotrigine were significantly less likely to report AEs/modify treatment. Conclusion- Patients taking newer AEDs were significantly less likely to report AEs, although the non-randomized study design does not allow the lower rate of AEs to be attributed with certainty to the use of newer AEDs. A standardized AE questionnaire appeared useful for monitoring AEs/optimizing AED therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)13-21
Number of pages9
JournalActa Neurologica Scandinavica
Volume124
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2011

Keywords

  • Antiepileptic drugs
  • Lamotrigine
  • Levetiracetam
  • Monotherapy
  • Polytherapy
  • Tolerability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

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