"Non-retinotopic processing" in ternus motion displays modeled by spatiotemporal filters

Arezoo Pooresmaeili, Guido Marco Cicchini, Maria Concetta Morrone, David Burr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Recently, M. Boi, H. Ogmen, J. Krummenacher, T. U. Otto, & M. H. Herzog (2009) reported a fascinating visual effect, where the direction of apparent motion was disambiguated by cues along the path of apparent motion, the Ternus-Pikler group motion, even though no actual movement occurs in this stimulus. They referred to their study as a "litmus test" to distinguish "non-retinotopic" (motion-based) from "retinotopic" (retina-based) image processing. We adapted the test to one with simple grating stimuli that could be more readily modeled and replicated their psychophysical results quantitatively with this stimulus. We then modeled our experiments in 3D (x, y, t) Fourier space and demonstrated that the observed perceptual effects are readily accounted for by integration of information within a detector that is oriented in space and time, in a similar way to previous explanations of other motion illusions. This demonstration brings the study of Boi et al. into the more general context of perception of moving objects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-15
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Vision
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Keywords

  • Retinotopic processing
  • Spatiotemporal filters
  • Ternus motion display

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems

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