Noncoding RNAs in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies: role in pathogenesis and future prognostic and therapeutic perspectives

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), such as miRNAs and long noncoding RNAs, are key regulators of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and represent promising therapeutic targets and biomarkers for several human diseases, including Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD/BMD). A role for ncRNAs in the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophies has been suggested, even if it is still incompletely understood. Here, we discuss current progress leading towards the clinical utility of ncRNAs for DMD/BMD. Long and short noncoding RNAs are differentially expressed in DMD/BMD and have a mechanism of action via targeting mRNAs. A subset of muscle-enriched miRNAs, the so-called myomiRs (miR-1, miR-133, and miR-206), are increased in the serum of patients with DMD and in dystrophin-defective animal models. Interestingly, myomiRs might be used as biomarkers, given that their levels can be corrected after dystrophin restoration in dystrophic mice. Remarkably, further evidence demonstrates that ncRNAs also play a role in dystrophin expression; thus, their modulations might represent a potential therapeutic strategy with the aim of upregulating the dystrophin protein in combination with other oligonucleotides/gene therapy approaches.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4299-4313
JournalCellular and Molecular Life Sciences
Volume77
Issue number21
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Keywords

  • Antisense oligonucleotides
  • Becker muscular dystrophy
  • Biomarkers
  • Duchenne muscular dystrophy
  • lncRNA
  • miRNA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Pharmacology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Cell Biology

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