Noninvasive ventilation with positive airway pressure in paediatric intensive care

G. Ottonello, G. Villa, L. Doglio, M. Pedemonte, M. C. Diana, R. Casciaro, A. De Alessandri, G. Silvestri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim. The aim of the present study is to retrospectively evaluate the effectiveness of noninvasive pressure ventilation in the 24-bed Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) of the G. Gaslini Institute during a 24-month period. Methods. A retrospective analysis of the characteristics (pH, CO2, SpO2, respiratory rate, oxygen requirement) of patients treated with noninvasive mechanical ventilation for different acute pathologies has been performed. Results. Twenty patients (mean age 7.4±0.28 years) with acute respiratory failure due to different pathologies were treated with noninvasive mechanical ventilation. They were divided into 2 groups: the hypoxic group, suffering from pulmonary diseases, and the hypercapnic group, presenting a failure of the mechanical strength or increased dead space. Modalities of ventilation were pressure assisted/controlled or pressure support, delivered through nasal or facial masks. Fifteen out of 20 patients presented a marked improvement of oxygenation and ventilation. Mean times of treatment were 69 and 200 h in the hypoxic and hypercapnic groups, respectively. Five patients required intubation. Two patients presented reversible skin lesions over the nasal bridge. Conclusion. Noninvasive ventilation can be used in PICU. Major advantages regard immunocompromised children and patients with exacerbations from chronic respiratory diseases, whereas the exact role of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation in patients affected by acute respiratory distress syndrome is still controversial.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)85-89
Number of pages5
JournalMinerva Pediatrica
Volume59
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2007

Fingerprint

Noninvasive Ventilation
Critical Care
Pediatrics
Pressure
Pediatric Intensive Care Units
Nose
Artificial Respiration
Ventilation
Pathology
Positive-Pressure Respiration
Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome
Immunocompromised Host
Respiratory Rate
Masks
Intubation
Respiratory Insufficiency
Lung Diseases
Chronic Disease
Oxygen
Skin

Keywords

  • Neonatal intensive care
  • Positive pressure ventilation, inspiratory
  • Respiratory insufficiency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Ottonello, G., Villa, G., Doglio, L., Pedemonte, M., Diana, M. C., Casciaro, R., ... Silvestri, G. (2007). Noninvasive ventilation with positive airway pressure in paediatric intensive care. Minerva Pediatrica, 59(2), 85-89.

Noninvasive ventilation with positive airway pressure in paediatric intensive care. / Ottonello, G.; Villa, G.; Doglio, L.; Pedemonte, M.; Diana, M. C.; Casciaro, R.; De Alessandri, A.; Silvestri, G.

In: Minerva Pediatrica, Vol. 59, No. 2, 04.2007, p. 85-89.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ottonello, G, Villa, G, Doglio, L, Pedemonte, M, Diana, MC, Casciaro, R, De Alessandri, A & Silvestri, G 2007, 'Noninvasive ventilation with positive airway pressure in paediatric intensive care', Minerva Pediatrica, vol. 59, no. 2, pp. 85-89.
Ottonello, G. ; Villa, G. ; Doglio, L. ; Pedemonte, M. ; Diana, M. C. ; Casciaro, R. ; De Alessandri, A. ; Silvestri, G. / Noninvasive ventilation with positive airway pressure in paediatric intensive care. In: Minerva Pediatrica. 2007 ; Vol. 59, No. 2. pp. 85-89.
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