Normal and leukaemic haematopoiesis in bone marrow and peripheral blood of patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In the majority of newly diagnosed patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML), the bone marrow contains consistent numbers of normal Ph-negative surrogate stem cells (LTC-IC) which seem to decline rapidly with time. This is confirmed by mobilization studies showing that early after diagnosis is the optimal time to collect Ph-negative progenitor to be utilized for restoring Ph-negative haematopoiesis. In the marrow of the majority of CML patients at diagnosis Ph-positive LTC-IC are found at a lower frequency than Ph-negative LTC-IC and, unexpectedly, they do not show a tendency to increase with time as long as patients remain in chronic phase. Therefore, the decline of normal haematopoiesis does not seem related to a parallel increase in Ph-positive stem cells.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)199-208
Number of pages10
JournalBest Practice and Research: Clinical Haematology
Volume12
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1999

Keywords

  • CML
  • Interferon
  • LTC-IC
  • Philadelphia chromosome
  • Stem cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

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