Normothermia does not improve postoperative hemostasis nor does it reduce inflammatory activation in patients undergoing primary isolated coronary artery bypass

Mario Gaudino, Roberto Zamparelli, Felicita Andreotti, Francesco Burzotta, Licia Iacoviello, Franco Glieca, Maria Benedett, Attilio Maseri, Rocco Schiavello, Gianfederico Possati

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Despite its common acceptance in clinical practice, the effective benefits of normothermic systemic perfusion during coronary artery bypass operations are far from established. Methods: A total of 113 patients undergoing primary isolated coronary artery bypass were randomly assigned to normothermic (37°C) or hypothermic (26°C) systemic perfusion. The clinical course of the patients was prospectively recorded, and several inflammatory and fibrinolytic markers (C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, interleukin 6, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, platelets, and white blood cell counts) were determined before surgical intervention; 24, 48, and 72 hours thereafter; and at hospital discharge. Results: Postoperatively, 2 in-hospital deaths occurred in the normothermic series and none in the hypothermic series. Four patients had a myocardial infarction, 1 had respiratory insufficiency, 1 had to be reoperated on for graft malfunction, and none had renal insufficiency in the hypothermic group versus 1 patient with each of these complications in the normothermic series. Mean blood loss in the first 24 hours was 766 ± 223 mL in the normothermic group and 740 ± 220 mL in the hypothermic group. None of these differences was statistically significant. Similarly, no significant difference in the postoperative level of any of the measured variables at any time point was evident between the patients in the normothermic and hypothermic groups. Conclusion: Normothermic systemic perfusion does not influence the clinical course or the extent of inflammatory and hemostatic activation in patients undergoing primary isolated coronary artery bypass.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1092-1100
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume123
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2002

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Hemostasis
Coronary Artery Bypass
Perfusion
Partial Thromboplastin Time
Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1
Prothrombin Time
Hemostatics
Leukocyte Count
Respiratory Insufficiency
C-Reactive Protein
Fibrinogen
Renal Insufficiency
Interleukin-6
Blood Platelets
Myocardial Infarction
Transplants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery

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Normothermia does not improve postoperative hemostasis nor does it reduce inflammatory activation in patients undergoing primary isolated coronary artery bypass. / Gaudino, Mario; Zamparelli, Roberto; Andreotti, Felicita; Burzotta, Francesco; Iacoviello, Licia; Glieca, Franco; Benedett, Maria; Maseri, Attilio; Schiavello, Rocco; Possati, Gianfederico.

In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Vol. 123, No. 6, 01.06.2002, p. 1092-1100.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gaudino, Mario ; Zamparelli, Roberto ; Andreotti, Felicita ; Burzotta, Francesco ; Iacoviello, Licia ; Glieca, Franco ; Benedett, Maria ; Maseri, Attilio ; Schiavello, Rocco ; Possati, Gianfederico. / Normothermia does not improve postoperative hemostasis nor does it reduce inflammatory activation in patients undergoing primary isolated coronary artery bypass. In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery. 2002 ; Vol. 123, No. 6. pp. 1092-1100.
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AU - Zamparelli, Roberto

AU - Andreotti, Felicita

AU - Burzotta, Francesco

AU - Iacoviello, Licia

AU - Glieca, Franco

AU - Benedett, Maria

AU - Maseri, Attilio

AU - Schiavello, Rocco

AU - Possati, Gianfederico

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N2 - Background: Despite its common acceptance in clinical practice, the effective benefits of normothermic systemic perfusion during coronary artery bypass operations are far from established. Methods: A total of 113 patients undergoing primary isolated coronary artery bypass were randomly assigned to normothermic (37°C) or hypothermic (26°C) systemic perfusion. The clinical course of the patients was prospectively recorded, and several inflammatory and fibrinolytic markers (C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, interleukin 6, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, platelets, and white blood cell counts) were determined before surgical intervention; 24, 48, and 72 hours thereafter; and at hospital discharge. Results: Postoperatively, 2 in-hospital deaths occurred in the normothermic series and none in the hypothermic series. Four patients had a myocardial infarction, 1 had respiratory insufficiency, 1 had to be reoperated on for graft malfunction, and none had renal insufficiency in the hypothermic group versus 1 patient with each of these complications in the normothermic series. Mean blood loss in the first 24 hours was 766 ± 223 mL in the normothermic group and 740 ± 220 mL in the hypothermic group. None of these differences was statistically significant. Similarly, no significant difference in the postoperative level of any of the measured variables at any time point was evident between the patients in the normothermic and hypothermic groups. Conclusion: Normothermic systemic perfusion does not influence the clinical course or the extent of inflammatory and hemostatic activation in patients undergoing primary isolated coronary artery bypass.

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