Obesity and psoriatic arthritis: From pathogenesis to clinical outcome and management

Anna Russolillo, Salvatore Iervolino, Rosario Peluso, Roberta Lupoli, Alessandro Di minno, Nicola Pappone, Matteo Nicola Dario Di minno

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

PsA is an axial and/or peripheral inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis, included in the group of spondylarthritides. It has been suggested that PsA could be a systemic disease, involving even coronary arteries and the heart. An increased prevalence of vascular risk factors has been found in PsA subjects as compared with the general population and psoriatic subjects. Moreover, PsA patients exhibit an increased prevalence of liver steatosis, a marker of metabolic syndrome, and of obesity. Interestingly, many reports demonstrate that adipose tissue is metabolically active, representing a source of inflammatory mediators, known as adipokines. The latter include TNF-α, macrophage chemoattractant protein-1, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), IL-6, leptin and adiponectin, leading to a pro-inflammatory status in obese subjects. This evidence supports the idea of obesity as a low-grade inflammatory disease. Accordingly, obesity might be associated with some rheumatic diseases. In particular, it seems to affect several features of PsA, such as its development, cardiovascular risk and clinical outcome. Recent data suggest that increased BMI in early adulthood increases the risk of PsA development in psoriatic patients, supporting a link between fat-mediated inflammation and joint involvement. Obesity may represent an additive cardio-metabolic risk factor in PsA subjects. Abdominal obesity may also determine an increased risk of not achieving minimal disease activity in PsA patients, highlighting the role of abdominal fat accumulation as a negative predictor of good clinical response to biologic agents. This review assesses the relationship between obesity and PsA according to the available literature.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberkes242
Pages (from-to)62-67
Number of pages6
JournalRheumatology
Volume52
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2013

Fingerprint

Psoriatic Arthritis
Obesity
Spondylarthritis
Abdominal Fat
Adipokines
Abdominal Obesity
Adiponectin
Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1
Chemotactic Factors
Biological Factors
Fatty Liver
Leptin
Rheumatic Diseases
Psoriasis
Arthritis
Adipose Tissue
Interleukin-6
Coronary Vessels
Joints
Fats

Keywords

  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Obesity
  • Psoriasis
  • Psoriatic arthritis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Russolillo, A., Iervolino, S., Peluso, R., Lupoli, R., Di minno, A., Pappone, N., & Di minno, M. N. D. (2013). Obesity and psoriatic arthritis: From pathogenesis to clinical outcome and management. Rheumatology, 52(1), 62-67. [kes242]. https://doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/kes242

Obesity and psoriatic arthritis : From pathogenesis to clinical outcome and management. / Russolillo, Anna; Iervolino, Salvatore; Peluso, Rosario; Lupoli, Roberta; Di minno, Alessandro; Pappone, Nicola; Di minno, Matteo Nicola Dario.

In: Rheumatology, Vol. 52, No. 1, kes242, 01.2013, p. 62-67.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Russolillo, A, Iervolino, S, Peluso, R, Lupoli, R, Di minno, A, Pappone, N & Di minno, MND 2013, 'Obesity and psoriatic arthritis: From pathogenesis to clinical outcome and management', Rheumatology, vol. 52, no. 1, kes242, pp. 62-67. https://doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/kes242
Russolillo, Anna ; Iervolino, Salvatore ; Peluso, Rosario ; Lupoli, Roberta ; Di minno, Alessandro ; Pappone, Nicola ; Di minno, Matteo Nicola Dario. / Obesity and psoriatic arthritis : From pathogenesis to clinical outcome and management. In: Rheumatology. 2013 ; Vol. 52, No. 1. pp. 62-67.
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