Obesity Paradox in Atrial Fibrillation: Implications for Outcomes and Relationship with Oral Anticoagulant Drugs

Marco Proietti, Giuseppe Boriani

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

In the last 40 years, concern about the obesity epidemic has increased. Data from the current literature highlight a strong relationship between obesity and atrial fibrillation (AF), particularly in relation to an increased risk for incident and recurrent AF. A phenomenon called the “obesity paradox” has emerged: the apparently counterintuitive evidence from epidemiological data indicating that overweight and obese patients may have a better prognosis than healthy-weight patients. A differential impact of oral anticoagulants (OACs) in terms of effectiveness and safety in the various body mass index categories has been postulated, particularly in the comparison between non-vitamin-K antagonist oral anticoagulants and vitamin K antagonists. This review aims to summarize the evidence on the impact of obesity in patients with AF, focusing on descriptions of the obesity paradox and its relationships with OAC treatment.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiovascular Drugs
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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