Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) does not affect ventilatory and perceptual responses to exercise in morbidly obese subjects

Giulia Innocenti Bruni, Francesco Gigliotti, Giorgio Scano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We have tested the hypothesis that high mass loading effects and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) constrain the ventilatory response to exercise in morbidly obese subjects as compared to their counterparts without OSA. Fifteen obese patients with (8) and without OSA and 12 lean healthy subjects performed incremental cycle exercise. The functional evaluation included ventilation, oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide production, end-expiratory-lung-volumes (EELV), inspiratory capacity, heart rate, dyspnea and leg effort (by a modified Borg scale). Changes in ventilation and dyspnea per unit changes in work rate and metabolic variables were similar in the three groups. Breathing pattern and heart rate increased from rest to peak exercise similarly in the three groups. Leg effort was the prevailing symptom for stopping exercise in most subjects. In conclusion, OSA does not limit exercise capacity in morbidly obese subjects. Ventilation contributes to exertional dyspnea similarly as in lean subjects and in obese patients regardless of OSA.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)193-200
Number of pages8
JournalRespiratory Physiology and Neurobiology
Volume183
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 30 2012

Keywords

  • Anaerobic threshold
  • Breathing pattern
  • Dyspnea
  • Leg effort
  • Operational lung volumes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Neuroscience(all)

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