Occupational exposures and colorectal cancers: A quantitative overview of epidemiological evidence

Enrico Oddone, Carlo Modonesi, Gemma Gatta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A traditional belief widespread across the biomedical community was that dietary habits and genetic predisposition were the basic factors causing colorectal cancer. In more recent times, however, a growing evidence has shown that other determinants can be very important in increasing (or reducing) incidence of this malignancy. The hypothesis that environmental and occupational risk factors are associated with colorectal cancer is gaining ground, and high risks of colorectal cancer have been reported among workers in some industrial branches. The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiologic relationship between colorectal cancer and occupational exposures to several industrial activities, by means of a scientific literature review and meta-analysis. This work pointed out increased risks of colorectal cancer for labourers occupied in industries with a wide use of chemical compounds, such as leather (RR = 1.70, 95%CI: 1.24-2.34), basic metals (RR = 1.32, 95%CI: 1.07-1.65), plastic and rubber manufacturing (RR = 1.30, 95%CI: 0.98-1.71 and RR = 1.27, 95%CI: 0.92-1.76, respectively), besides workers in the sector of repair and installation of machinery exposed to asbestos (RR = 1.40, 95%CI: 1.07-1.84). Based on our results, the estimated crude excess risk fraction attributable to occupational exposure ranged from about 11% to about 15%. However, homogeneous pattern of association between colorectal cancer and industrial branches did not emerge from this review.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)12431-12444
Number of pages14
JournalWorld Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume20
Issue number35
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 21 2014

Keywords

  • Basic metals
  • Chemical compounds
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Meta analysis
  • Occupational exposures
  • Public health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Occupational exposures and colorectal cancers: A quantitative overview of epidemiological evidence'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this