Occupational stress is associated with impaired work ability and reduced quality of life in patients with chronic kidney failure

Luca Neri, Lisa A Rocca Rey, Maurizio Gallieni, Diego Brancaccio, Mario Cozzolino, Antonio Colombi, Thomas E. Burroughs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: About 300,000 patients in the United States with Chronic Kidney Failure (CKF) are of working age, but up to 70% lose their job within the first year of renal replacement therapy. No study has examined how work ability and perceived health are influenced by the subjects' adjustment to their job. We assessed the association of occupational stress (Effort-Reward Imbalance, ERI), work ability (WAI) and health-related quality of life (QoL) in hemodialysis. Methods: 40 employed hemodialysis patients completed a self-administered questionnaire. Associations between ERI, short Form 12 (SF-12), short Form - 6 Dimensions (SF-6D), Kidney Disease QOL - 36 (KDQOL-36) and WAI were tested with partial Spearman's correlation adjusted for age, income, and comorbidity burden. Results: study subjects were mainly low-income (82%), African-American (73%), men (75%); 16 were manual laborers and 9 worked in the industrial sector. Study subjects reported low levels of Occupational Stress: ERI scores indicated an imbalance between Job Efforts and Rewards in only 3 subjects. Nevertheless, ERI scores were inversely and strongly associated with WAI (p=-0.41, p

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)291-298
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Artificial Organs
Volume32
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Keywords

  • Employment
  • Industrial psychology
  • Occupational health
  • Psychosocial factors
  • Quality of life
  • Renal dialysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Bioengineering
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

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