Occurrence of human immunodeficiency virus type i (HIV-I)-specific cytolytic t cell activity in apparently uninfected children born to HIV-1-infected mothers

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Abstract

Human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-l)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity against different viral antigens, including env, gag/pol, and nef, was detected in peripheral blood lymphocytes of as many as 25% of uninfected children born to HIV-I-infected mothers. The relatively high frequency of this finding in uninfected, exposed children suggests that CTL-mediated immunity may playa key role in the control or even elimination of the virus. Further characterization of this natural model of potentially protective immunity could provide new insight and suggest further strategies for the development of HIV-1 vaccines.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1296-1299
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume170
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Immunology

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