Ocular impairment of toxoplasmosis.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purpose of this review is to update the latest information about ocular toxoplasmosis. The infection can be congenital or acquired, but also depends about the immune condition of the patient and can affect the eye. Ocular symptoms are variable according to the age of the subject. Retinochoroiditis is the most common manifestation of toxoplasmic infection. Toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis typically affects the posterior pole, and the lesions can be solitary or multiple. Active lesions present as grey-white focus of retinal necrosis with adjacent choroiditis, vasculitis, hemorrhage and vitreitis. Anterior uveitis is a common finding. Atypical presentations include punctate outer retinitis, neuroretinitis and papillitis. Depending on the patient's age and the localization of the lesion, ocular symptoms vary usually presenting with reduced visual acuity or without symptoms. The laboratory diagnosis of toxoplasmosis is based on detection of antibodies and T. gondii DNA using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) which fulfillis clinical findings. Toxoplasmosis therapy includes antimicrobial drugs and corticosteroids. There are several regimens with different drug combinations including, among others, pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine, clindamycin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazol.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35-36
Number of pages2
JournalParassitologia
Volume50
Issue number1-2
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2008

Fingerprint

Ocular Toxoplasmosis
Retinitis
Toxoplasmosis
Choroiditis
Anterior Uveitis
Pyrimethamine
Papilledema
Clindamycin
Clinical Laboratory Techniques
Drug Combinations
DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase
Vasculitis
Infection
Visual Acuity
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Necrosis
Hemorrhage
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Antibodies
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology

Cite this

Ocular impairment of toxoplasmosis. / Antoniazzi, E.; Guagliano, R.; Meroni, V.; Pezzotta, S.; Bianchi, P. E.

In: Parassitologia, Vol. 50, No. 1-2, 06.2008, p. 35-36.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{6fbacaf127e44f599008164fa23d91e1,
title = "Ocular impairment of toxoplasmosis.",
abstract = "The purpose of this review is to update the latest information about ocular toxoplasmosis. The infection can be congenital or acquired, but also depends about the immune condition of the patient and can affect the eye. Ocular symptoms are variable according to the age of the subject. Retinochoroiditis is the most common manifestation of toxoplasmic infection. Toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis typically affects the posterior pole, and the lesions can be solitary or multiple. Active lesions present as grey-white focus of retinal necrosis with adjacent choroiditis, vasculitis, hemorrhage and vitreitis. Anterior uveitis is a common finding. Atypical presentations include punctate outer retinitis, neuroretinitis and papillitis. Depending on the patient's age and the localization of the lesion, ocular symptoms vary usually presenting with reduced visual acuity or without symptoms. The laboratory diagnosis of toxoplasmosis is based on detection of antibodies and T. gondii DNA using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) which fulfillis clinical findings. Toxoplasmosis therapy includes antimicrobial drugs and corticosteroids. There are several regimens with different drug combinations including, among others, pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine, clindamycin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazol.",
author = "E. Antoniazzi and R. Guagliano and V. Meroni and S. Pezzotta and Bianchi, {P. E.}",
year = "2008",
month = "6",
language = "English",
volume = "50",
pages = "35--36",
journal = "Parassitologia",
issn = "0048-2951",
publisher = "Lombardo Editore",
number = "1-2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ocular impairment of toxoplasmosis.

AU - Antoniazzi, E.

AU - Guagliano, R.

AU - Meroni, V.

AU - Pezzotta, S.

AU - Bianchi, P. E.

PY - 2008/6

Y1 - 2008/6

N2 - The purpose of this review is to update the latest information about ocular toxoplasmosis. The infection can be congenital or acquired, but also depends about the immune condition of the patient and can affect the eye. Ocular symptoms are variable according to the age of the subject. Retinochoroiditis is the most common manifestation of toxoplasmic infection. Toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis typically affects the posterior pole, and the lesions can be solitary or multiple. Active lesions present as grey-white focus of retinal necrosis with adjacent choroiditis, vasculitis, hemorrhage and vitreitis. Anterior uveitis is a common finding. Atypical presentations include punctate outer retinitis, neuroretinitis and papillitis. Depending on the patient's age and the localization of the lesion, ocular symptoms vary usually presenting with reduced visual acuity or without symptoms. The laboratory diagnosis of toxoplasmosis is based on detection of antibodies and T. gondii DNA using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) which fulfillis clinical findings. Toxoplasmosis therapy includes antimicrobial drugs and corticosteroids. There are several regimens with different drug combinations including, among others, pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine, clindamycin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazol.

AB - The purpose of this review is to update the latest information about ocular toxoplasmosis. The infection can be congenital or acquired, but also depends about the immune condition of the patient and can affect the eye. Ocular symptoms are variable according to the age of the subject. Retinochoroiditis is the most common manifestation of toxoplasmic infection. Toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis typically affects the posterior pole, and the lesions can be solitary or multiple. Active lesions present as grey-white focus of retinal necrosis with adjacent choroiditis, vasculitis, hemorrhage and vitreitis. Anterior uveitis is a common finding. Atypical presentations include punctate outer retinitis, neuroretinitis and papillitis. Depending on the patient's age and the localization of the lesion, ocular symptoms vary usually presenting with reduced visual acuity or without symptoms. The laboratory diagnosis of toxoplasmosis is based on detection of antibodies and T. gondii DNA using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) which fulfillis clinical findings. Toxoplasmosis therapy includes antimicrobial drugs and corticosteroids. There are several regimens with different drug combinations including, among others, pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine, clindamycin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazol.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=56149100621&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=56149100621&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 18693554

AN - SCOPUS:56149100621

VL - 50

SP - 35

EP - 36

JO - Parassitologia

JF - Parassitologia

SN - 0048-2951

IS - 1-2

ER -