Ocular Involvement in Children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Samuele Naviglio, Fulvio Parentin, Silvia Nider, Nicolò Rassu, Stefano Martelossi, Alessandro Ventura, Alessandro Ventura

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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Abstract

Copyright © 2017 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation. Background: Data on ocular manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children are limited. Some authors have reported a high prevalence of asymptomatic uveitis, yet the significance of these observations is unknown and there are no recommendations on which ophthalmologic follow-up should be offered. Methods: Children with IBD seen at a single referral center for pediatric gastroenterology were offered ophthalmologic evaluation as part of routine care for their disease. Ophthalmologic evaluation included review of ocular history as well as slit-lamp and fundoscopic examination. Medical records were also reviewed for previous ophthalmologic diagnoses or complaints. Results: Data from 94 children were included (52 boys; median age 13.4 yr). Forty-six patients had a diagnosis of Crohn's disease, 46 ulcerative colitis, and 2 IBD unclassified. Intestinal disease was in clinical remission in 70% of the patients; fecal calprotectin was elevated in 64%. One patient with Crohn's disease had a previous diagnosis of clinically manifest uveitis (overall uveitis prevalence: 1.06%; incidence rate: 0.3 per 100 patient-years). This patient was also the only one who was found to have asymptomatic uveitis at slit-lamp examination. A second patient had posterior subcapsular cataract associated with corticosteroid treatment. No signs of intraocular complications from previous unrecognized uveitis were observed in any patient. Conclusions: Children with IBD may have asymptomatic uveitis, yet its prevalence seems lower than previously reported, and it was not found in children without a previous diagnosis of clinically manifest uveitis. No ocular complications from prior unrecognized uveitis were observed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)986-990
Number of pages5
JournalInflammatory Bowel Diseases
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2017

Fingerprint

Uveitis
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Crohn Disease
Eye Manifestations
Leukocyte L1 Antigen Complex
Intestinal Diseases
Gastroenterology
Colitis
Ulcerative Colitis
Cataract
Medical Records
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Referral and Consultation
History
Pediatrics
Incidence

Keywords

  • children
  • extraintestinal manifestations
  • inflammatory bowel disease
  • uveitis

Cite this

Ocular Involvement in Children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease. / Naviglio, Samuele; Parentin, Fulvio; Nider, Silvia; Rassu, Nicolò; Martelossi, Stefano; Ventura, Alessandro; Ventura, Alessandro.

In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Vol. 23, No. 6, 01.06.2017, p. 986-990.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Naviglio, Samuele ; Parentin, Fulvio ; Nider, Silvia ; Rassu, Nicolò ; Martelossi, Stefano ; Ventura, Alessandro ; Ventura, Alessandro. / Ocular Involvement in Children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease. In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases. 2017 ; Vol. 23, No. 6. pp. 986-990.
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abstract = "Copyright {\circledC} 2017 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation. Background: Data on ocular manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children are limited. Some authors have reported a high prevalence of asymptomatic uveitis, yet the significance of these observations is unknown and there are no recommendations on which ophthalmologic follow-up should be offered. Methods: Children with IBD seen at a single referral center for pediatric gastroenterology were offered ophthalmologic evaluation as part of routine care for their disease. Ophthalmologic evaluation included review of ocular history as well as slit-lamp and fundoscopic examination. Medical records were also reviewed for previous ophthalmologic diagnoses or complaints. Results: Data from 94 children were included (52 boys; median age 13.4 yr). Forty-six patients had a diagnosis of Crohn's disease, 46 ulcerative colitis, and 2 IBD unclassified. Intestinal disease was in clinical remission in 70{\%} of the patients; fecal calprotectin was elevated in 64{\%}. One patient with Crohn's disease had a previous diagnosis of clinically manifest uveitis (overall uveitis prevalence: 1.06{\%}; incidence rate: 0.3 per 100 patient-years). This patient was also the only one who was found to have asymptomatic uveitis at slit-lamp examination. A second patient had posterior subcapsular cataract associated with corticosteroid treatment. No signs of intraocular complications from previous unrecognized uveitis were observed in any patient. Conclusions: Children with IBD may have asymptomatic uveitis, yet its prevalence seems lower than previously reported, and it was not found in children without a previous diagnosis of clinically manifest uveitis. No ocular complications from prior unrecognized uveitis were observed.",
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