Olfactory dysfunction as a prognostic marker for disability progression in Multiple Sclerosis: An olfactory event related potential study

Rosella Ciurleo, Lilla Bonanno, Simona De Salvo, Laura Romeo, Carmela Rifici, Edoardo Sessa, Giangaetano D'Aleo, Margherita Russo, Placido Bramanti, Silvia Marino, Fabrizia Caminiti

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Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease and one of the leading causes of disability in young adults. Functional markers able to predict MS progression are still lacking. It is recognized that olfactory dysfunction may be an early symptom in MS. The aim of this study was to investigate whether alterations in olfactory event-related potentials could play a prognostic role in MS. Thirty patients affected by MS relapsing-remitting underwent an olfactory potential examination (T0). Three years after baseline (T1), 28 of 30 patients were clinically evaluated by expanded disability status scale. In addition, the number of Disease Modifying Therapies (DMTs) and the total number of relapses occurred in the last 3 years were collected. At T1, we observed a negative correlation between presence/absence of olfactory potentials and expanded disability status scale scores (rpb = -0.48; p = 0.009). A significant trend for a negative correlation between presence/absence of olfactory potentials and disease duration (rpb = -0.36; p = 0.06) and total number of relapses (rpb = -0.34; p = 0.08) was found. Only patients with olfactory potential absence showed a significant trend in the difference of the disability status scale (p = 0.06) between T0 and T1. In the sub-group of patients with reduced olfactory potential amplitude, we detected a trend for a negative correlation between the disability status scale and the amplitude of N1-P2 components more marked at T1 (r = -0.52; p = 0.06) than T0 (r = -0.47; p = 0.09). This is the first study that evaluated the prognostic role of olfactory event-related potentials in MS. Our results highlighted that olfactory alterations of MS patients were related to disability progression and, to a lesser extent, disease activity. The analysis of olfactory potential parameters confirmed the involvement in olfactory network damage of inflammatory and/or neurodegeneration processes which could predict the progressive course of the disease.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0196006
JournalPLoS One
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2018

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sclerosis
Evoked Potentials
Multiple Sclerosis
relapse
Recurrence
Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis
Young Adult
young adults
disease course
Chronic Disease
signs and symptoms (animals and humans)
therapeutics
duration

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Disability Evaluation
  • Disabled Persons
  • Disease Progression
  • Evoked Potentials
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Multiple Sclerosis/complications
  • Olfaction Disorders/etiology
  • Prognosis
  • Reproducibility of Results

Cite this

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title = "Olfactory dysfunction as a prognostic marker for disability progression in Multiple Sclerosis: An olfactory event related potential study",
abstract = "Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease and one of the leading causes of disability in young adults. Functional markers able to predict MS progression are still lacking. It is recognized that olfactory dysfunction may be an early symptom in MS. The aim of this study was to investigate whether alterations in olfactory event-related potentials could play a prognostic role in MS. Thirty patients affected by MS relapsing-remitting underwent an olfactory potential examination (T0). Three years after baseline (T1), 28 of 30 patients were clinically evaluated by expanded disability status scale. In addition, the number of Disease Modifying Therapies (DMTs) and the total number of relapses occurred in the last 3 years were collected. At T1, we observed a negative correlation between presence/absence of olfactory potentials and expanded disability status scale scores (rpb = -0.48; p = 0.009). A significant trend for a negative correlation between presence/absence of olfactory potentials and disease duration (rpb = -0.36; p = 0.06) and total number of relapses (rpb = -0.34; p = 0.08) was found. Only patients with olfactory potential absence showed a significant trend in the difference of the disability status scale (p = 0.06) between T0 and T1. In the sub-group of patients with reduced olfactory potential amplitude, we detected a trend for a negative correlation between the disability status scale and the amplitude of N1-P2 components more marked at T1 (r = -0.52; p = 0.06) than T0 (r = -0.47; p = 0.09). This is the first study that evaluated the prognostic role of olfactory event-related potentials in MS. Our results highlighted that olfactory alterations of MS patients were related to disability progression and, to a lesser extent, disease activity. The analysis of olfactory potential parameters confirmed the involvement in olfactory network damage of inflammatory and/or neurodegeneration processes which could predict the progressive course of the disease.",
keywords = "Adult, Disability Evaluation, Disabled Persons, Disease Progression, Evoked Potentials, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Multiple Sclerosis/complications, Olfaction Disorders/etiology, Prognosis, Reproducibility of Results",
author = "Rosella Ciurleo and Lilla Bonanno and {De Salvo}, Simona and Laura Romeo and Carmela Rifici and Edoardo Sessa and Giangaetano D'Aleo and Margherita Russo and Placido Bramanti and Silvia Marino and Fabrizia Caminiti",
year = "2018",
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doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0196006",
language = "English",
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journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Olfactory dysfunction as a prognostic marker for disability progression in Multiple Sclerosis

T2 - An olfactory event related potential study

AU - Ciurleo, Rosella

AU - Bonanno, Lilla

AU - De Salvo, Simona

AU - Romeo, Laura

AU - Rifici, Carmela

AU - Sessa, Edoardo

AU - D'Aleo, Giangaetano

AU - Russo, Margherita

AU - Bramanti, Placido

AU - Marino, Silvia

AU - Caminiti, Fabrizia

PY - 2018/4

Y1 - 2018/4

N2 - Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease and one of the leading causes of disability in young adults. Functional markers able to predict MS progression are still lacking. It is recognized that olfactory dysfunction may be an early symptom in MS. The aim of this study was to investigate whether alterations in olfactory event-related potentials could play a prognostic role in MS. Thirty patients affected by MS relapsing-remitting underwent an olfactory potential examination (T0). Three years after baseline (T1), 28 of 30 patients were clinically evaluated by expanded disability status scale. In addition, the number of Disease Modifying Therapies (DMTs) and the total number of relapses occurred in the last 3 years were collected. At T1, we observed a negative correlation between presence/absence of olfactory potentials and expanded disability status scale scores (rpb = -0.48; p = 0.009). A significant trend for a negative correlation between presence/absence of olfactory potentials and disease duration (rpb = -0.36; p = 0.06) and total number of relapses (rpb = -0.34; p = 0.08) was found. Only patients with olfactory potential absence showed a significant trend in the difference of the disability status scale (p = 0.06) between T0 and T1. In the sub-group of patients with reduced olfactory potential amplitude, we detected a trend for a negative correlation between the disability status scale and the amplitude of N1-P2 components more marked at T1 (r = -0.52; p = 0.06) than T0 (r = -0.47; p = 0.09). This is the first study that evaluated the prognostic role of olfactory event-related potentials in MS. Our results highlighted that olfactory alterations of MS patients were related to disability progression and, to a lesser extent, disease activity. The analysis of olfactory potential parameters confirmed the involvement in olfactory network damage of inflammatory and/or neurodegeneration processes which could predict the progressive course of the disease.

AB - Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease and one of the leading causes of disability in young adults. Functional markers able to predict MS progression are still lacking. It is recognized that olfactory dysfunction may be an early symptom in MS. The aim of this study was to investigate whether alterations in olfactory event-related potentials could play a prognostic role in MS. Thirty patients affected by MS relapsing-remitting underwent an olfactory potential examination (T0). Three years after baseline (T1), 28 of 30 patients were clinically evaluated by expanded disability status scale. In addition, the number of Disease Modifying Therapies (DMTs) and the total number of relapses occurred in the last 3 years were collected. At T1, we observed a negative correlation between presence/absence of olfactory potentials and expanded disability status scale scores (rpb = -0.48; p = 0.009). A significant trend for a negative correlation between presence/absence of olfactory potentials and disease duration (rpb = -0.36; p = 0.06) and total number of relapses (rpb = -0.34; p = 0.08) was found. Only patients with olfactory potential absence showed a significant trend in the difference of the disability status scale (p = 0.06) between T0 and T1. In the sub-group of patients with reduced olfactory potential amplitude, we detected a trend for a negative correlation between the disability status scale and the amplitude of N1-P2 components more marked at T1 (r = -0.52; p = 0.06) than T0 (r = -0.47; p = 0.09). This is the first study that evaluated the prognostic role of olfactory event-related potentials in MS. Our results highlighted that olfactory alterations of MS patients were related to disability progression and, to a lesser extent, disease activity. The analysis of olfactory potential parameters confirmed the involvement in olfactory network damage of inflammatory and/or neurodegeneration processes which could predict the progressive course of the disease.

KW - Adult

KW - Disability Evaluation

KW - Disabled Persons

KW - Disease Progression

KW - Evoked Potentials

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Multiple Sclerosis/complications

KW - Olfaction Disorders/etiology

KW - Prognosis

KW - Reproducibility of Results

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0196006

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0196006

M3 - Article

C2 - 29664936

VL - 13

JO - PLoS One

JF - PLoS One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 4

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ER -