OnabotulinumtoxinA for adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD): Functional results and the role of dosage

M. R. Marchese, L. D'Alatri, A. R. Bentivoglio, G. Paludetti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To report the results of functional outcome, dose trend and relationship between onabotulinumtoxinA (onabotA) dosage and the severity of disease or time between therapy sessions in patients affected by adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD). Patients and methods: Thirty-two patients underwent 193 EMG-guided intracordal injections of a starting dose of 2 MU of onabotA. At enrollment, each subject was administered the VHI. The response was evaluated using a subjective rating scale (0–100% of normal phonation). Results: The quality of voice improved significantly after 1 month and stabilized by 3 months. The percentage of normal voice improved 33.34 ± 11.5% (min 26 – max 68). The functional gain was significantly worse in patients presenting with ADSD associated with dystonias in other body regions (31% vs 45% - p < 0.05). The mean dose employed was 3.64 MU (min 1 – max 6) with a trend of increasing dosages up to the 5th treatment after which the doses stabilized over time. The pre-treatment VHI showed a weakly positive correlation with the cumulative dose at the 5th and 10th injections. Benefit duration and the mean between treatment interval were 103 and 136 days respectively. The correlation between dose and inter-injection time is weakly negative (r = −0.22, p < 0.05), however, this is influenced predominantly by the first-to-second injection. After this initial treatment effect, the correlation becomes weakly positive (r = 0.12). Conclusions: Our data confirm the efficacy of onabotA to improve the quality of voice in cases of ADSD. The trial period for optimal dosage lasted up to a mean of five injections. The dosage of onabotA impacted the length of response and was influenced by the severity of ADSD. Finally the efficacy of onabotA did not change significantly after repeated administrations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)38-42
Number of pages5
JournalToxicon
Volume155
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2018

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Dysphonia
Injections
Voice Quality
Therapeutics
Phonation
Body Regions
Dystonia
onabotulinumtoxinA

Keywords

  • Adductor spasmodic dysphonia
  • Botulinum toxin
  • Botulinum toxin dosage
  • Laryngeal dystonia
  • onabotulinumtoxinA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology

Cite this

OnabotulinumtoxinA for adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD) : Functional results and the role of dosage. / Marchese, M. R.; D'Alatri, L.; Bentivoglio, A. R.; Paludetti, G.

In: Toxicon, Vol. 155, 01.12.2018, p. 38-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Marchese, M. R. ; D'Alatri, L. ; Bentivoglio, A. R. ; Paludetti, G. / OnabotulinumtoxinA for adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD) : Functional results and the role of dosage. In: Toxicon. 2018 ; Vol. 155. pp. 38-42.
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abstract = "Objective: To report the results of functional outcome, dose trend and relationship between onabotulinumtoxinA (onabotA) dosage and the severity of disease or time between therapy sessions in patients affected by adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD). Patients and methods: Thirty-two patients underwent 193 EMG-guided intracordal injections of a starting dose of 2 MU of onabotA. At enrollment, each subject was administered the VHI. The response was evaluated using a subjective rating scale (0–100{\%} of normal phonation). Results: The quality of voice improved significantly after 1 month and stabilized by 3 months. The percentage of normal voice improved 33.34 ± 11.5{\%} (min 26 – max 68). The functional gain was significantly worse in patients presenting with ADSD associated with dystonias in other body regions (31{\%} vs 45{\%} - p < 0.05). The mean dose employed was 3.64 MU (min 1 – max 6) with a trend of increasing dosages up to the 5th treatment after which the doses stabilized over time. The pre-treatment VHI showed a weakly positive correlation with the cumulative dose at the 5th and 10th injections. Benefit duration and the mean between treatment interval were 103 and 136 days respectively. The correlation between dose and inter-injection time is weakly negative (r = −0.22, p < 0.05), however, this is influenced predominantly by the first-to-second injection. After this initial treatment effect, the correlation becomes weakly positive (r = 0.12). Conclusions: Our data confirm the efficacy of onabotA to improve the quality of voice in cases of ADSD. The trial period for optimal dosage lasted up to a mean of five injections. The dosage of onabotA impacted the length of response and was influenced by the severity of ADSD. Finally the efficacy of onabotA did not change significantly after repeated administrations.",
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