Oncocytoma managed by active surveillance in a transplant allograft kidney: A case report

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Abstract

Background: The ethical implications of the utilization of kidneys with solid renal masses (SRMs) in transplantation are the subject of lively debate in the transplantation community and beyond. One of such implications is that as the life expectancy of renal transplant patients improve, the prevalence of SRMs in donors is likely to increase. We report a case of an oncocytoma in a renal allograft complicating a deceased-donor kidney transplant. Case presentation: A 60-year-old woman received and underwent deceased-donor renal transplantation for end-stage renal disease after a waiting-list period of 11 years. Kidney Doppler ultrasound (DUS) of the deceased donor was negative for any nodular lesion. The finding of the DUS, done on postoperative day 1, to assess the patency of the graft, was suspicious for an acute arterial thrombosis but did not reveal any focal irregularities. An ensuing computed tomography (CT) scan did not show any arterial complications but serendipitously revealed a 2.4-cm lesion on the upper pole of the renal allograft, which was not detected during the back-table or ultrasonography monitoring. Histology of the biopsied lesion was consistent with oncocytoma. However, because the eosinophilic variant of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma may morphologically resemble renal oncocytoma, immunohistochemical staining was performed. The results were negative, ruling out chromophobe RCC. After discussing the therapeutic options and potential related outcomes with the patient, we found no reason for resection of the lesion or an allograft nephrectomy, given the low risk of malignant transformation in an oncocytoma. Active surveillance of the benign tumor was done with ultrasonography, every 2 months, for the first year and, then, with magnetic resonance imaging, every year. The patient received mycophenolate-mofetil, tacrolimus, and prednisone throughout the 5-year follow-up period, and the regimen for immunosuppression was not changed despite the presence of the renal mass. After 60 months, we report that none of the radiological findings have shown any morphological changes of the lesion, and the patient is well. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, we report the first case of an oncocytoma in a renal allograft complicating a deceased-donor kidney transplant, which was successfully managed by active surveillance.

Original languageEnglish
Article number123
JournalWorld Journal of Surgical Oncology
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2 2018

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Oxyphilic Adenoma
Allografts
Transplants
Kidney
Tissue Donors
Doppler Ultrasonography
Ultrasonography
Transplantation
Mycophenolic Acid
Waiting Lists
Tacrolimus
Prednisone
Life Expectancy
Nephrectomy
Renal Cell Carcinoma
Kidney Transplantation
Immunosuppression
Chronic Kidney Failure
Histology
Thrombosis

Keywords

  • Kidney transplantation
  • Oncocytoma
  • Renal transplantation
  • Solid renal mass

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Oncology

Cite this

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title = "Oncocytoma managed by active surveillance in a transplant allograft kidney: A case report",
abstract = "Background: The ethical implications of the utilization of kidneys with solid renal masses (SRMs) in transplantation are the subject of lively debate in the transplantation community and beyond. One of such implications is that as the life expectancy of renal transplant patients improve, the prevalence of SRMs in donors is likely to increase. We report a case of an oncocytoma in a renal allograft complicating a deceased-donor kidney transplant. Case presentation: A 60-year-old woman received and underwent deceased-donor renal transplantation for end-stage renal disease after a waiting-list period of 11 years. Kidney Doppler ultrasound (DUS) of the deceased donor was negative for any nodular lesion. The finding of the DUS, done on postoperative day 1, to assess the patency of the graft, was suspicious for an acute arterial thrombosis but did not reveal any focal irregularities. An ensuing computed tomography (CT) scan did not show any arterial complications but serendipitously revealed a 2.4-cm lesion on the upper pole of the renal allograft, which was not detected during the back-table or ultrasonography monitoring. Histology of the biopsied lesion was consistent with oncocytoma. However, because the eosinophilic variant of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma may morphologically resemble renal oncocytoma, immunohistochemical staining was performed. The results were negative, ruling out chromophobe RCC. After discussing the therapeutic options and potential related outcomes with the patient, we found no reason for resection of the lesion or an allograft nephrectomy, given the low risk of malignant transformation in an oncocytoma. Active surveillance of the benign tumor was done with ultrasonography, every 2 months, for the first year and, then, with magnetic resonance imaging, every year. The patient received mycophenolate-mofetil, tacrolimus, and prednisone throughout the 5-year follow-up period, and the regimen for immunosuppression was not changed despite the presence of the renal mass. After 60 months, we report that none of the radiological findings have shown any morphological changes of the lesion, and the patient is well. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, we report the first case of an oncocytoma in a renal allograft complicating a deceased-donor kidney transplant, which was successfully managed by active surveillance.",
keywords = "Kidney transplantation, Oncocytoma, Renal transplantation, Solid renal mass",
author = "Duilio Pagano and {di Francesco}, Fabrizio and Liotta Rosa and Nwaiwu, {Chibueze A.} and {Li Petri}, Sergio and Salvatore Gruttadauria",
year = "2018",
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language = "English",
volume = "16",
journal = "World Journal of Surgical Oncology",
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T1 - Oncocytoma managed by active surveillance in a transplant allograft kidney

T2 - A case report

AU - Pagano, Duilio

AU - di Francesco, Fabrizio

AU - Rosa, Liotta

AU - Nwaiwu, Chibueze A.

AU - Li Petri, Sergio

AU - Gruttadauria, Salvatore

PY - 2018/7/2

Y1 - 2018/7/2

N2 - Background: The ethical implications of the utilization of kidneys with solid renal masses (SRMs) in transplantation are the subject of lively debate in the transplantation community and beyond. One of such implications is that as the life expectancy of renal transplant patients improve, the prevalence of SRMs in donors is likely to increase. We report a case of an oncocytoma in a renal allograft complicating a deceased-donor kidney transplant. Case presentation: A 60-year-old woman received and underwent deceased-donor renal transplantation for end-stage renal disease after a waiting-list period of 11 years. Kidney Doppler ultrasound (DUS) of the deceased donor was negative for any nodular lesion. The finding of the DUS, done on postoperative day 1, to assess the patency of the graft, was suspicious for an acute arterial thrombosis but did not reveal any focal irregularities. An ensuing computed tomography (CT) scan did not show any arterial complications but serendipitously revealed a 2.4-cm lesion on the upper pole of the renal allograft, which was not detected during the back-table or ultrasonography monitoring. Histology of the biopsied lesion was consistent with oncocytoma. However, because the eosinophilic variant of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma may morphologically resemble renal oncocytoma, immunohistochemical staining was performed. The results were negative, ruling out chromophobe RCC. After discussing the therapeutic options and potential related outcomes with the patient, we found no reason for resection of the lesion or an allograft nephrectomy, given the low risk of malignant transformation in an oncocytoma. Active surveillance of the benign tumor was done with ultrasonography, every 2 months, for the first year and, then, with magnetic resonance imaging, every year. The patient received mycophenolate-mofetil, tacrolimus, and prednisone throughout the 5-year follow-up period, and the regimen for immunosuppression was not changed despite the presence of the renal mass. After 60 months, we report that none of the radiological findings have shown any morphological changes of the lesion, and the patient is well. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, we report the first case of an oncocytoma in a renal allograft complicating a deceased-donor kidney transplant, which was successfully managed by active surveillance.

AB - Background: The ethical implications of the utilization of kidneys with solid renal masses (SRMs) in transplantation are the subject of lively debate in the transplantation community and beyond. One of such implications is that as the life expectancy of renal transplant patients improve, the prevalence of SRMs in donors is likely to increase. We report a case of an oncocytoma in a renal allograft complicating a deceased-donor kidney transplant. Case presentation: A 60-year-old woman received and underwent deceased-donor renal transplantation for end-stage renal disease after a waiting-list period of 11 years. Kidney Doppler ultrasound (DUS) of the deceased donor was negative for any nodular lesion. The finding of the DUS, done on postoperative day 1, to assess the patency of the graft, was suspicious for an acute arterial thrombosis but did not reveal any focal irregularities. An ensuing computed tomography (CT) scan did not show any arterial complications but serendipitously revealed a 2.4-cm lesion on the upper pole of the renal allograft, which was not detected during the back-table or ultrasonography monitoring. Histology of the biopsied lesion was consistent with oncocytoma. However, because the eosinophilic variant of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma may morphologically resemble renal oncocytoma, immunohistochemical staining was performed. The results were negative, ruling out chromophobe RCC. After discussing the therapeutic options and potential related outcomes with the patient, we found no reason for resection of the lesion or an allograft nephrectomy, given the low risk of malignant transformation in an oncocytoma. Active surveillance of the benign tumor was done with ultrasonography, every 2 months, for the first year and, then, with magnetic resonance imaging, every year. The patient received mycophenolate-mofetil, tacrolimus, and prednisone throughout the 5-year follow-up period, and the regimen for immunosuppression was not changed despite the presence of the renal mass. After 60 months, we report that none of the radiological findings have shown any morphological changes of the lesion, and the patient is well. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, we report the first case of an oncocytoma in a renal allograft complicating a deceased-donor kidney transplant, which was successfully managed by active surveillance.

KW - Kidney transplantation

KW - Oncocytoma

KW - Renal transplantation

KW - Solid renal mass

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