One-Carbon Metabolism: Biological Players in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

Andrea Rizzo, Alessandra Napoli, Francesca Roggiani, Antonella Tomassetti, Marina Bagnoli, Delia Mezzanzanica

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Metabolism is deeply involved in cell behavior and homeostasis maintenance, with metabolites acting as molecular intermediates to modulate cellular functions. In particular, one-carbon metabolism is a key biochemical pathway necessary to provide carbon units required for critical processes, including nucleotide biosynthesis, epigenetic methylation, and cell redox-status regulation. It is, therefore, not surprising that alterations in this pathway may acquire fundamental importance in cancer onset and progression. Two of the major actors in one-carbon metabolism, folate and choline, play a key role in the pathobiology of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), the deadliest gynecological malignancy. EOC is characterized by a cholinic phenotype sustained via increased activity of choline kinase alpha, and via membrane overexpression of the alpha isoform of the folate receptor (FRα), both of which are known to contribute to generating regulatory signals that support EOC cell aggressiveness and proliferation. Here, we describe in detail the main biological processes associated with one-carbon metabolism, and the current knowledge about its role in EOC. Moreover, since the cholinic phenotype and FRα overexpression are unique properties of tumor cells, but not of normal cells, they can be considered attractive targets for the development of therapeutic approaches.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Molecular Sciences
Volume19
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 19 2018

Fingerprint

metabolism
Metabolism
Carbon
cancer
Folic Acid
carbon
choline
phenotype
Folate Receptor 1
Choline Kinase
Redox cells
Phenotype
Biological Phenomena
Neoplasms
cells
Methylation
Biosynthesis
homeostasis
Nucleotides
Metabolites

Keywords

  • Carbon/metabolism
  • Carcinoma, Ovarian Epithelial
  • Choline/metabolism
  • Female
  • Folic Acid/metabolism
  • Humans
  • Models, Biological
  • Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial/metabolism
  • Ovarian Neoplasms/metabolism

Cite this

One-Carbon Metabolism : Biological Players in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer. / Rizzo, Andrea; Napoli, Alessandra; Roggiani, Francesca; Tomassetti, Antonella; Bagnoli, Marina; Mezzanzanica, Delia.

In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, Vol. 19, No. 7, 19.07.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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