One hundred consecutive patients treated with magnetic sphincter augmentation for gastroesophageal reflux disease: 6 years of clinical experience from a single center

Luigi Bonavina, Greta Saino, Davide Bona, Andrea Sironi, Veronica Lazzari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: This study was undertaken to evaluate our clinical experience during a 6-year period with an implantable device that augments the lower esophageal sphincter for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The device uses magnetic sphincter augmentation (MSA) to strengthen the antireflux barrier. Study Design: In a single-center, prospective case series, 100 consecutive patients underwent laparoscopic MSA for GERD between March 200& and February 2012. Clinical outcomes for each patient were tracked post implantation and compared with presurgical data for esophageal pH measurements, symptom scores, and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use. Results: Median implant duration was 3 years (range 378 days to 6 years). Median total acid exposure time was reduced from 8.0% before implant to 3.2% post implant (p <0.001). The median GERD Health Related Quality of Life score at baseline was 16 on PPIs and 24 off PPIs and improved to a score of 2 (p <0.001). Freedom from daily dependence on PPIs was achieved in 85% of patients. There have been no long-term complications, such as device migrations or erosions. Three patients had the device laparoscopically removed for persistent GERD, odynophagia, or dysphagia, with subsequent resolution of symptoms. Conclusions: Magnetic sphincter augmentation for GERD in clinical practice provides safe and long-term reduction of esophageal acid exposure, substantial symptom improvement, and elimination of daily PPI use. For candidates of antireflux surgery who have been carefully evaluated before surgery to confirm indication for MSA, MSA has become a standard treatment at our institution because control of reflux symptoms and pH normalization can be achieved with minimal side effects and preservation of gastric anatomy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)577-585
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American College of Surgeons
Volume217
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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