Origin of respiratory sinus arrhythmia in conscious humans: An important role for arterial carotid baroreceptors

Massimo Piepoli, Peter Sleight, Stefano Leuzzi, Felice Valle, Giammario Spadacini, Claudio Passino, Jim Johnston, Luciano Bernardi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: We investigated whether respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) in healthy humans originated from central neuronal oscillations or from peripheral baroreceptors responding to respiratory changes in venous return. Methods and Results: During subjects' controlled breathing we used sinusoidal neck suction to influence RSA (spectral analysis of RR interval). In 11 subjects, 20-second apnea greatly reduced RSA, which was restored by neck suction at the frequency of respiration. Counteracting the respiration- induced cycles of carotid blood pressure decreased RSA in 13 subjects (from 2136±682 to 1372±561 ms2, P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1813-1821
Number of pages9
JournalCirculation
Volume95
Issue number7
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 1997

Keywords

  • arrhythmia
  • baroreceptors
  • blood pressure
  • respiration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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    Piepoli, M., Sleight, P., Leuzzi, S., Valle, F., Spadacini, G., Passino, C., Johnston, J., & Bernardi, L. (1997). Origin of respiratory sinus arrhythmia in conscious humans: An important role for arterial carotid baroreceptors. Circulation, 95(7), 1813-1821.