Otoneurologic evaluation of child vertigo

R. D'Agostino, V. Tarantino, A. Melagrana, G. Taborelli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study 282 children with vertigo are subdivided (according to previous experiences) into three large groups: (11 vertigo and cochlear diseases; (2) vertigo as an isolated symptom; and (3) vertigo and C.S.N. diseases. Due to the difficult etiopathogenetic investigation of the patients from the second group, the authors focused on that group as they are less studied, are without associated symptoms (deafness-first group; CNS diseases- second group) and where vertigo appears as an idiopathic and an isolated symptom. A careful anamnestic, clinical and instrumental analysis leads to the following observations: (1) in decreasing order of frequency we find the third group, followed by the first and finally by the second; (2) in spite of the overall lower incidence of the second group, this latter includes the paroxismal benign vertigo (PBV) which is overall the second most frequent vertiginous form (after vertigo due to cranial trauma). In this group the authors underline the reasonably high incidence of the iatrogenic syndromes, insisting on the need of their accurate prevention of these risks: (3) the authors confirm that, nowadays, a reliable etiopathogenetic cause of the apparently isolated vertigo (except for the ascertained iatrogenic forms) cannot be identified. Moreover, in spite of its frequency, PBV is the less known form of vertigo, of which we cannot give a certain diagnosis and which can be identified only by the exclusion of all the other known forms through instrumental and clinical observations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)133-139
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Volume40
Issue number2-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 20 1997

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Vertigo
Cochlear Diseases
Central Nervous System Diseases
Incidence
Deafness

Keywords

  • Diagnosis
  • Idiopathic vertigo
  • Incidence of PBV in childhood
  • Infant vertigo
  • Otoneurologic exam

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Otoneurologic evaluation of child vertigo. / D'Agostino, R.; Tarantino, V.; Melagrana, A.; Taborelli, G.

In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, Vol. 40, No. 2-3, 20.06.1997, p. 133-139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

D'Agostino, R. ; Tarantino, V. ; Melagrana, A. ; Taborelli, G. / Otoneurologic evaluation of child vertigo. In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology. 1997 ; Vol. 40, No. 2-3. pp. 133-139.
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